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1895, Cornelius Peara - Unfit For Publication
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Cornelius Peara, 1895 – Indecent assault

Below also see: Cornelius Charles, 1898,
Cornelius Charles, 1899
Cornelius Peara, 1900,
Cornelius Peera, 1901
Cornelius Peara, 1902 – Murder, Stealing
Charles Williams, 1909,
Charles Williams, 1915 – Indecent exposure

 

Clarence and Richmond Examiner, Sat 19 Oct 1895 1

GRAFTON CIRCUIT COURT.
————

THIS Court was opened on Tuesday at 10 am pefore [sic] his Honor Acting-Judge Cohen. Mr Garland acted as Crown Prosecutor. The other members of the legal profession present were Mr Watt (barrister), the local solicitors, and Mr Robison, Maclean. Mr Innes acted as Judge’s Associate, and Mr Houston attended from the Crown Solicitor’s office.

SECOND DAY—Wednesday.

GRAFTON CIRCUIT COURT.
(Continued from page 3.)
————

Cornelius Peara, a coloured man, was arraigned for having, at Duranbar, near Cudgen, indecently assaulted Priscilla Goold, [aka Priscilla Gould], eight years of age. Accused pleaded not guilty, and was defended by Mr McGuren.

Cudgen, c. 1922. ‘Large groups of people would picnic there and would buy a kerosene tin of hot water for tea, taken out of a copper kept boiling - Cudgen Headland, NSW’. Image: NSW State Library collection. Reproduction: Peter de Waal
Cudgen, c. 1922. ‘Large groups of people would picnic there and
would buy a kerosene tin of hot water for tea, taken out of a
copper kept boiling - Cudgen Headland, NSW’. Image: NSW State
Library collection. Reproduction: Peter de Waal

    Jury: Robert Dickson, Wm Ford, Wm B Browne, Walter Paine, Thos Shannon, Henry Gillett, Adam Martin, Walter J Capp, Alex McPhee, Ed Finn, Wm Kay, John Ensbey.

    All females and lads under 16 were ordered to leave the Court, and at the suggestion of his Honor the whole of the spectators left the Court.

    The evidence of prosecutrix went to show that she and her brother went for some wood along the tram line, when they saw accused, who called her back. She, not suspecting anything wrong, complied, when accused committed an assault of an indecent nature. Accused offered her a shilling not to tell her mother. She informed her mother next day of what had occurred.

    James Goold, brother of prosecutrix’s, went out with his sister on 28th June for some wood. His sister dropped behind, and when he again saw her, accused was in the act of committing the assault. He heard accused offer his sister a shilling not to inform on him.

    Mrs Goold, mother of the previous witnesses, sent them out for some wood, and the next day the little girl made a complaint, in consequence of which she examined her and found an assault had been committed.

    Richard Mooney Sam, a West Indian and canegrower, residing with Mrs Goold, corroborated the latter’s evidence. Witness, on the Sunday morning after the occurrence, challenged him with assaulting the girl. Accused replied that witness wanted to have a row and went away. He then went to Cudgen, six miles distant, and gave information to the police. Accused was partner in a contract with witness, but left before much of it was completed.

    Constable Jones arrested accused about 10 miles from Cudgen, and seven miles from Goold’s place. Accused made no reply to the charge. The girl was examined by Dr McDonald, who made the report produced. A fortnight before accused wanted witness, who is acting CPS at Cudgen, to grant him a summons against Richard Mooney Sam for wages, but not having the money he deferred obtaining it till a future time.

    Accused did not make a statement, and no evidence was tendered for the defence.

    The jury retired at 7.25 pm, and after a deliberation of 3 hours 20 minutes returned a verdict of guilty.

    Accused had nothing to say why sentence should not be passed.

    Mr McGuren pointed out that accused had already been in gaol three months, and urged his Honor to consider this in passing sentence.

    His Honor said that the jury found accused guilty, and on the evidence, which was conclusive and in every sense reliable, he did not see how they could come to any other verdict. The sentence of the court was that accused be imprisonment in Grafton gaol for two years with hard labour.

    There was a second charge against Peara for indecently assaulting James Goold, [aka James Gould], but the Crown Prosecutor intimated he would not proceed with it.

    At 10.50 pm the court adjourned till 10 am next day.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~


Cornelius Peara, Gaol photo sheet 2

SRNSW: NRS2258, [3/5993], Grafton Gaol photographic description book, Nov 1894-Jun 1910, No. 9, p. 10, R5125.


Gaol Photo Sheet - 
Transcribed Details

No. 9
Grafton

Date when Portrait was taken: 18 October 1895

Name: Cornelius Peara

Native place: Ceylon

Year of birth: 1868

Arrived       Ship: Duke of Sutherland
in Colony }   Year: 1882

Trade or occupation
previous to conviction  } Labourer

Religion: Roman Catholic

Education, degree of: Read + write

Height: 5' 5⅛"

Weight     On committal: 128
in lbs     } On discharge:

Colour of hair: Black

Colour of eyes: Black

Marks or special features: (?) mouth and shin medium, scar under left eye, large figure of female tattooted on right forearm

(No. of previous Portrait ... ) 

CONVICTIONS

Where and When Offence. Sentence

Grafton CC

16

10

1895

Indecently assaulting a girl under
the age of 14 years

Two years H.L.
Grafton Gaol

 


 
Cornelius Charles, 1898

 

Clarence and Richmond Examiner, Sat 16 Apr 1898 3

GRAFTON POLICE COURT.
————

On Tuesday, before the PM.

    Cornelius Charles was charged with stealing a quantity of clothing from the residence of Alexander Cameron, at Carrs Creek.

    Constable Austen deposed to seeing accused at his residence the day previous, and made certain inquiries. In a loft on the premises he found various articles of clothing (described), which accused said were his. Previous to this accused denied all existence of the loft.

    Alex Cameron, a labourer, stated that accused was employed on the same farm as he was, and slept in the kitchen. He missed some property from the place, articles of clothing, which he detailed, and valued at about 35s.

    Accused elected summary jurisdiction, and pleaded guilty, stating that when he saw the clothes he was tempted to take them, as he was short of clothes.

    He was sentenced to four months’ hard labour.

    Accused was further charged with stealing a net, the property of D McFarlane, of Carrs Creek, and was remanded to Friday for the production of evidence.

GRAFTON POLICE COURT.
————

Yesterday, before the PM and Mr L Jacobs, JP.

    The charge against Cornelius Charles for having stolen a net, the property of D McFarlane, of Carrs Creek, was withdrawn, the net found on accused not being identical with that reported stolen.

 


 
Cornelius Charles, 1899

Clarence and Richmond Examiner, Sat 22 Apr 1899 4

POLICE COURTS.
————

AT Grafton yesterday, before the PM.

    Cornelius Charles was charged with presenting loaded firearms at Alfred Foreman at Clarenza on 19th instant. Mr Donaldson appeared for the accused.

    Constable Ferguson deposed to going to Gregor’s place at Clarenza on Wednesday, and saw accused. He asked him what kind of row he had been having with Foreman. Accused alleged that Foreman had taken some mandarins from him; that he got a gun, went up to Foreman, told him to stand, and pointing the gun at him threatened to shoot him. He said he brought Foreman back to the house and made him stand on the back verandah, accused carrying the gun by his side while this was going on. At witness’ request obtained the gun that he had on the day in question. It was a double-barrelled gun, and accused said it as not loaded, but on the witness going to examine it he admitted it was loaded in one barrel. The right hand barrell [sic] was loaded with shot cartridge. In reply to a question accused said he would have shot Foreman had he not stopped when he directed him, as he considered he had no right to take his mandarins. On being brought to the lockup accused said it was a funny law; that he had frequently seen what he was charged with done in Queensland.

    Alf Foreman, fisherman, residing at Grafton,, stated that, in company with Rudolph Paine, he went to Gregor’s ro sell some fish, saw accused, who said that no fish were wanted that day. On passing a mandarin tree he picked one of the fruit, and walked on 70 or 80 yards. Hearing someone call out, he turned round and saw accused, who help up a gun, and told him to come back or he would shoot him. Accused had the gun to his shoulder in the attitude of shooting. Asked him what he meant, and he accused witness of taking a mandarin. He told witness to come back to the place and remain till Gregor came home. He advised accused to put the gun down, or there would be a noise about it. Told his mate, Paine, to go for the police. Accused threatened to shoot him if he went to the boat. Accused stood with gun for sometime after Paine left. Finally accused put the gun away, and at his invitation witness partook of dinner. After this accused said “Be good friends and go; I’ll put you across the river.” He then lent witness his boat to cross the river, and while on his way he met Paine returning with Constable Ferguson.

    R[udolph] Paine gave corroborative evidence.

    Mr Donaldson contended that a prima facie case had not been made out against accused.

    The PM considered that the accused was not justified in taking the course he did.

    Accused reserved his defence, and was committed to take his trial at the Quarter Sessions, to be held at Grafton on June 30th, bail allowed himself in £40, and one surety in £40.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Clarence and Richmond Examiner, Sat 1 Jul 1899 5

GRAFTON QUARTER SESSIONS.
———

THE Sessions were opened yesterday morning before his Honor Judge Coffey. Mr Browning acted as Crown Prosecutor, and the local solicitors were in attendance.

    The Court adjourned till 9.30 am, to-day. There are two other cases on the calendar, Cornelius Charles, for presenting firearms; and Alfred Dennis, alleged horse stealing.

    Owing to the steamer not leaving Sydney on Tuesday night, His Honor could not arrive to open the Maclean District Court on Thursday next.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Clarence and Richmond Examiner, Tue 4 Jul 1899 6

GRAFTON QUARTER SESSIONS.
———

This Court re-opened at 9.30 am on Saturday, before his Honor Judge Coffey.

ALLEGED ASSAULT.

    Cornelius Charles, on bail, was charged with presenting firearms at Alfred Foreman, at Clarenza, on April 19th. The accused pleaded not guilty, and was defended by Mr Donaldson.

    Jury: Joseph Bailey, JD Whalan, S See, Marcus Davis, J Cochrane, junr, E Parkinson, FG Blanch, C Everingham, W Davidson junr, J Parsons, T Gidley, T Shore.

    The facts of the case were, briefly, that accused, who is a Cingalese, was left in charge of W Gregor’s place at Clarenza. Foreman, who is a fish vendor, went to the place and picked an orange, and was in the act of leaving when accused called after him, directing him to stand. He kept Foreman in custody for some time. A lad was sent by Foreman for the police, but before their arrival accused released his prisoner, and was considerate enough to give him his dinner before he left.

    Accused gave a humorous version of the occurrence. He did not “partickler” [sic] point the gun at Foreman. He directed Foreman to remain till Gregor came home, or he would shoot him. He invited Foreman to dinner, and eventually consented to release him on condition that he said no more about it. They shook hands over the matter, and Foreman left the place.

    His Honor in summing up explained that the law did not justify a person presenting firearms at another. The question for the jury was did accused do this.

    The jury, after a retirement of 10 minutes, returned a verdict of not guilty.

 


 
Cornelius Peara, 1900

Clarence and Richmond Examiner, Sat 28 Jul 1900 7

POLICE COURTS.
————

AT Grafton, on Tuesday, before the PM.

    Cornelius Peara summoned C Hassanshaw for assault. There was another case of assault, Peara v. Charles Delane, and it was resolved to take both cases together. Mr Everingham appeared for Peara, and Mr Donaldson for defendants. The parties are Indians, and the alleged assaults originated over a dispute about some property. Hassanshaw was fined 40s, together with 9s 6d costs, 21s professional costs, and 10s witnesses expenses. The case against Delane was dismissed.

    On Thursday before the PM.

    In the matter of search warrant obtained by Charles Hassanshaw to search a box belonging to Cornelius Peara. Sergeant Duke Deane gave evidence, stating that under this authority he searched the box, and found therein a pair of dungaree trousers, which Hassanshaw claimed as his property. Claimant [Charles Hassanshaw] also gave evidence, stating that he had not given Peara any permission to take the property. The Bench ordered restoration of the property to Hassanshaw.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Clarence and Richmond Examiner, Sat 10 Nov 1900 8

POLICE COURTS.
———◦———

AT Grafton on Wednesday,

    At Grafton, yesterday, before the PM and Mr L Jacobs, JP.

    Cornelius Peara summoned Matthew Egan for the sum of £11 12s 6d, alleged to be due for wages as a groom. Mr McGuren for complainant, Mr Everingham for defendant. Complainant stated that he was first engaged at 15s per week and it was increased 20 20s. Defendant stated that Peara was engaged for 10s a week, and it was increased to 15s. He stated that complainant had been fully paid. Information dismissed.

 


 
Cornelius Peera, 1901

Clarence and Richmond Examiner, Tue 8 Jan 1901 9

POLICE COURTS.
————

Yesterday before the PM.

    Cornelius Peera a Cingalese was charged with wounding James Murphy, at Grafton on Saturday, with intent to do grievous bodily harm. Accused was remanded till Friday next, bail allowed in sureties of £40. Mr Everingham appeared for accused.

    James Murphy was charged with unlawfully assaulting his wife, Annie Murphy at Grafton on Saturday. Mr Bawden appeared for accused.

    Defendant pleaded guilty, and was fined 20s or 14 days imprisonment, with hard labour, also to enter into recognisance to be of good behaviour for six months, himself in £40 and sureties to a like amount; in default of finding sureties, one month’s hard labour.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Clarence and Richmond Examiner, Sat 12 Jan 1901 10

GRAFTON POLICE COURT.
————

Yesterday before the PM.

    Cornelius Peera, on remand, was charged with assaulting James Murphy with intent to do grievous bodily harm. Mr Everingham appeared for accused.

    Sergeant Deane deposed that at 12 o’clock on Saturday night last he was on duty in Dobie-street when James Murphy made a complaint to him. His face and shirt were covered with blood, and a cut on his head. Witness went down the street and saw accused and Mrs Murphy. He made some remarks to the latter about the condition of her husband, when accused said that he struck Murphy with a stick as he was trying to kill his wife. He brought accused to Murphy, who said he was the man that tried to murder him, by hitting him on the head with a stick. On being asked the reason, Murphy said that there were some stones thrown on his house, and on going out he saw some persons standing on the street, he went up to them and asked what they meant, whereupon accused struck him with the stick on the head. Accused, on being arrested, said that Murphy chased some boys with a brick. Murphy had been charged with assaulting his wife, this latter assault taking place four hours previous to that committed by Peera. Mrs Murphy said she was afraid to return to her house while her husband was there.

    Dr [Grafton Elliott] Smith 11 examined Murphy and found his head and neck had dry blood on them, which came from a partly contused and lacerated wound on the top of the head. It was not a dangerous wound.

    The case was reduced to one of common assault, and to this Peera pleaded guilty under mitigating circumstances. Mrs Murphy told him to protect her from her husband’s violence, and he remained with her to protect her as she was afraid of him. Murphy approached him with a brick, and he was afraid that he was going to strike him. He then struck Murphy with the stick.

    James Murphy said that he asked some boys about stone-throwing on his house. While doing so he received a blow on the head from accused. He had nothing in his hand, nor did he attempt to strike accused.

    Arthur Green deposed to Murphy having a half brick in his hand at the time of the assault.

    Joseph Green stated that a couple of boys threw stones on Murphy’s verandah. This brought Murphy out, and on his coming over and asking who were the stone throwers, accused struck him on the head without any provocation. He did not see anything in Murphy’s hand.

    The PM said that he could not help thinking that a serious assault had been committed. He inflicted a fine of £5, together with £2 2s doctor’s expenses, in default three months’ hard labour in Grafton gaol. Peera was, in November, bound over to keep the peace for three months, and the PM estreated the recognisance entered into on that occasion; but left further action with respect to these sureties to be dealt with by the Clerk of the peace.

 


 
Cornelius Peara, 1902

Ashburton Guardian, (NZ), Mon 27 Jan 1902 12

TO-DAY’S TELEGRAMS.
———◦———
United Press Association—By Electric
Telegraph—Copyright

AUCKLAND, Jan 27

    Detective Maddern, acting on advice by cable, arrested an Asiatic yesterday on board the Warrimoo. The man’s name is Cornelius Peara, and he is charged with having, at Yamba, New South Wales, stolen a rifle, valued at 20s, and £3 in money, the property of Ah Lun. It is understood that other charges are pending.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Auckland Star (Auckland, NZ), Mon 27 Jan 1902 13

ALLEGED THEFT.
———◦———

    On the arrival of the s.s. Warrimoo from Sydney yesterday the police went on board and arrested an Asiatic named Cornelius Peara on a charge that on January 10th, at Yamba, New South Wales, he did steal one rifle, value 10/-, and £3 in money, the property of Ah Lun. Accused was arrested on receipt of a cable from the Sydney police. The sum of £17 10/ in gold was found in his possession and some silver. Accused was brought before the Police Court this morning, and, on the application of Chief-Detective Grace, was remanded for a week. It is understood another charge pending accused the accused.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Manawatu Standard, (NZ), Mon 27 Jan 1902 14

TELEGRAPHIC.
———◦———
(Press Association.)

Auckland, January 27.

    Detective Maddern, acting on advice by cable, arrested an Asiatic yesterday on board the Warrimoo named Cornelius Peara, who is charged with having stolen a rifle, valued at 10s and £3 in money, the property of A. H. [sic] Lun. It is understood other charges are pending.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Marlborough Express (Marlborough, NZ), Mon 27 Jan 1902 15

ARREST OF AN ASIATIC.
———◦———
Press Association.
Electric Telegraph. Copyright

Auckland, January 27.

    Detective Maddern, acting on advice by cable, arrested an Asiatic yesterday on board the Warrimoo. The man, whose name is Cornelius Peara, is charged with having, at Yamba, New South Wales, stolen a rifle valued at 20s and £3 in money, the property of Ah Lun. It is understood that other charges are pending.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Oamaru Mail, (NZ), Mon 27 Jan 1902 16

INTERPROVINCIAL NEWS
———◦———
(By Telegraph.)
————
Per Press Association.
————

————
AUCKLAND.

January 27.

    Detective Maddern, acting on advice received by cable, arrested an Asiatic yesterday on board the Warrimoo. The man’s name is Cornelius Peara, and he is charged with having, at Yamba, New South Wales, stolen a rifle, valued at 20s, and £3 in money, the property of Ah Lun. It is understood that other charges are pending.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Poverty Bay Herald, (NZ), Mon 27 Jan 1902 17

INTERPROVINCIAL
———◦———
(Per Press Association.)

Auckland, this day.


    Detective Maddern, acting on advice by cable, arrested an Asiatic yesterday on board the Warrimoo. The man’s name is Cornelius Peara, and he is charged with having stolen a rifle, valued at 10s, and £3 of money, the property of Ah Lun. It is understood that other charges are pending.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Star (Canterbury, NZ), Mon 27 Jan 1902 18

ARREST OF AN ASIATIC
———◦———
(Per Press Association.)

Auckland, Jan 27.

    Detective Maddern, acting on advice received by cable, arrested an Asiatic yesterday on board the Warrimoo. The man’s name is Cornelius Peara, and he is charged with having, at Yamba, New South Wales, stolen a rifle, valued at 20s, and £3 of money, the property of Ah Lun. It is understood that other charges are pending.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Wanganui Herald (Canterbury, NZ), Mon 27 Jan 1902 19

CHARGE AGAINST AN ASIATIC
————

AUCKLAND, January 27.

    Detective Maddern, acting on advice by cable, arrested an Asiatic yesterday on board the Warrimoo. The man’s name is Cornelius Peara, and he is charged with having, at Yanba, New South Wales, stolen a rifle, valued at 10s, and £3 in money, the property of Ah Lun. It is understood that other charges are pending.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

New Zealand Herald, (NZ), Fri 31 Jan 1902 20

AUSTRALIAN NEWS.
———◦———
By Telegraph.—Press Association.—Copyright.

CHARGE AGAINST AN ASIATIC.

Sydney, January 30.

    A constable is being despatched to identify the Cingalese arrested in Auckland.

    (On Sunday an Asiatic named Cornelius Peara, who arrived from Sydney by the Warrimoo, was arrested, being charged with having, at Yamba, New South Wales, on the 10th inst, stolen a rifle valued at 10s and £3 in money, the property of Ah Lun.)

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Wairarapa Daily Times, (NZ), Wed 12 Feb 1902 21

    The man Cornelius Peara, arrested at Auckland on a charge of theft at Yamba, New South Wales, was extradited yesterday.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Clarence and Richmond Examiner, Tue 25 Feb 1902 22

NOTANDA.
————

Yamba Bay, Clarence River Heads, 1884-1888. The two storey building with a peaked roof in the centre of the photograph is the Yamba Hotel built in 1884. Image: NSW State Library collection. Reproduction: Peter de Waal
Yamba Bay, Clarence River Heads, 1884-1888. The two storey
building with a peaked roof in the centre of the photograph is the
Yamba Hotel built in 1884. Image: NSW State Library collection.
Reproduction: Peter de Waal

    ARREST OF A PRISONER.—The Cingalese Cornelius Peera, [sic] who was arrested at New Zealand in connection with the disappearance of the Chinaman Ah Wun, at Yamba, arrived at Maclean yesterday in charge of Constable Ferguson, of the Grafton police. We understand he was formally brought up at the Maclean Police Court yesterday, charged with the larceny of a sum of money from the missing Chinaman, and remanded for the production of evidence. It will be remembered that Peera was in the employ of Ah Wun and another Chinese who were conducting a market garden at the Heads. The search for Ah Wun’s body has been unsuccessful, though foul play is fully suspected. Human blood stains, painted over, were found in the boat at Yamba, and this leads to the belief that the Chinaman was murdered by some one, and his body disposed of in the river. Prisoner is very reticent regarding the offence with which he is charged, but at times gives way to weeping. He is at present detained in the Maclean lock-up. We were informed last evening that Peera will be charged with the murder of Ah Wun, and that Mr Dowling has been retained to prosecute for the Crown.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Northern Star, Wed 5 Mar 1902 23

ODDS AND ENDS.


    THE YAMBA MYSTERY.—At the Maclean Police Court on Saturday Cornelius Peera was formally charged with the alleged murder at Yamba of Ah Won, [sic] and remanded till Thursday next. We understand the case will then be fully gone into. There are upwards to twenty witnesses for the Crown, and Mr Dowling will conduct the prosecution.—Grafton “Argus.”

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Clarence River Advocate, Fri 7 Mar 1902 24

ALLEGED MURDER.
————
THE YAMBA MYSTERY CASE.
————
Peera Before the Court.
————

AT the Maclean Police court on Thursday morning, before the PM (Mr Fitzhardinge), Cornelius Peera was charged with the wilful murder of Ah Won at Yamba.

River Street, Maclean, Jan 1926. Image: NSW State Library collection. Reproduction: Peter de Waal
River Street, Maclean, Jan 1926.
Image: NSW State Library collection. Reproduction: Peter de Waal

    Mr Dowling, on the advice of the Crown Solicitor, appeared to prosecute, and was instructed by Sub-Inspector Johnston. Mr CJ Clarke appeared for the accused.

    Sub-Inspector Johnston deposed that, from information received, he went to Yamba on the 24th January last, having sent constables and trackers to find the body of a Chinaman named Ah Won. On the 25th he went to the hut of a Chinaman named Ah Lun, about a mile from Yamba. He and the police and trackers searched about the garden and bush for 10 days, and had a diver searching the river for two days, but failed to find the body. On the 25th he made an examination of the hut and found a great quantity of what appeared to be blood all over the flooring boards and found that the blood had run down between the boards to the ground. He also found bloodstains on the bottom of the front room. He also produced a piece of barbed wire taken from the fence in front of the house, in direct line to the boatshed, on which there were also bloodstains. On the 26th he found some bedding in the hut, including sheets, pillow slips, and bed covering, all showing bloodstains; these were taken from a bunk in the bedroom of the house. A mosquito net very much torn and bloodstained, was found at the head of the bed. On the 2nd February he found a sail, mast, sprit and oars, all on the tie-beams of the hut, with bloodstains on them. He had examined the boat on the 25th January, and found bloodstains on it in several places. He examined the lining boards and found bloodstains on them, also on a stretcher and fore and after sheet. He saw accused at the police station on the 1st instant, and asked him some questions, after having cautioned him that anything he said would be given in evidence. Accused made a statement in reply to questions. The statement, which was read, was, briefly, to the effect that on the day on which Ah Lun went to Grafton, Ah Won, in fear of prosecution for attempted assault on a girl, had gone away, and he had written to Ah Lun to that effect. He had no row with Ah Won. He had cashed a £10 note at Yamba with Mr Tulloch, but did not remember cashing a note at Mrs Black’s. He had also cashed a £5 note at Palmer’s Island. The money was all his, he having saved it from things which he had sold. He had the money planted at Palmer’s Island when he went to work at Yamba, and on Sunday afterwards he pulled the Chinaman’s boat up and got in. This was about a week before the Chinaman went away. He had two £10 notes, one of which he obtained from a Chinese gambling place at Grafton, and the other from the barmaid at Egan’s hotel. He cleared out shortly after the Chinaman left because they left no tucker for him. He killed a pig. He had heard Ah Won say that he intended to go to China. Shortly after he went to work for Ah Lun the latter offered to sell him the garden for £40. Ah Lun knew he had money. He was never out in the Chinaman’s boat at night.

    Mr Clarke did not object to the statement going in, and the PM admitted it, but said he was doubtful about it.

    Sub-Inspector Johnston continuing, said that in reply to a question, Peera said that he had not written to Ah Lun at Grafton. Witness read portion of a letter produced, and he then said he did write it. The letter was undated, and the envelope bore the Yamba office stamp of January 14. He then charged him with the wilful murder of Ah Won at Yamba, on or about the 10th January. In reply he said, ‘I know nothing about him.’ The letter to Ah Lun stated that Ah Won had attempted to criminally assault a young girl who came to buy melons. The writer stated he did not know the girl and thought she came from Grafton.

    Constable Ferguson deposed to going to New Zealand for accused. The latter made a statement to him, saying that he had been paid his wages by Ah Lun in the presence of the other Chinaman, and the two Chinamen had then left for Grafton. He had left Yamba three days afterwards. In reply to further questions, accused said he had got £12 from Yet Wah at Grafton. He had sold a horse to a man whom he did not know, but the receipt was in his box at Samuel’s at Lawrence. He said he had also sold cows to Barnier and Smith for £5 each. He said he had the money planted at Palmer’s Island and went up and got it the night before he left for Sydney. He said the money was all gold. In reply to a question as to whether he had cashed notes at Sydney and got gold for them, he said he had. He replied to a further question that he did not think he had cashed notes at Yamba. Accused said it was a nice thing for the country to go to the expense of sending witness all the way over to New Zealand authorities over a b—– Chinaman. £18 10s 2½ was handed to him by the New Zealand authorities, having been taken from the prisoner, together with some Chinese coins, and some clothing. Accused admitted that the money and coins were his property.

    Senior-Constable Andrews corroborated Sub-Inspector Johnson’s evidence as to the bloodstains on the floor, and other details. He added that the boat appeared to have been scrubbed or painted after the bloodstains were made, and the boards appeared to have been washed. The floor where bloodstained also appeared to have been wiped.

    Constable Redman deposed that Ah Lun and Ah Won had been living together 5 or 6 years, and appeared to be very friendly. The garden was leased by Ah Lun, and Ah Won worked for him. Ah Lun often went away, and on these occasions Ah Won would be in charge. Never knew Ah Won to go away when Ah Lun was absent. He remembered Peera arriving at Yamba in December and going to work with the Chinamen. He corroborated the evidence of the Sub-Inspector as to part of the results of the search at the hut and the condition of the boat and gear. The bloodstained articles were taken to Sydney and handed over to the Government Analyst by witness. Sharks were plentiful about Yamba during the summer. On 16th January he saw accused at the boat, apparently doing something to the inside of it. Early in January accused asked witness if he could sent a few oysters on the steamer to a friend in Grafton; accused said he had no money. On the 9th January he passed by the boatshed and noticed that the boat was pulled well up. Some days afterwards he found near the boatshed, a tin which appeared to have recently held paint. From something he heard he afterwards made a closer examination of the lining boards, and found that bloodstains on them had been painted over with paint similar to that in the tin. On the 2nd instant he found a paint brush stuck near the roof of the hut, which appeared to be saturated with blood. He found a stick, bloodstained, at the hut, and also a piece of cocoanut husk, which had been saturated with blood as if used to wipe up blood.

    Constable Bradbury deposed that when giving accused his dinner in the lock-up on Saturday, he said: “They charge me with killing a Chinaman at Yamba. What you think? They can’t find Chinaman; they can’t do nothing to me.”

    WM Hamlet, Government Analyst for the State of NSW, deposed that Constable Redman delivered to him on the 7th February various articles with bloodstains. All the articles were carefully examined microscopically and chemically, and, with one or two exceptions, were stained with smears or splashes of mammalian blood. He noticed, with regard to the lining boards of the boat, that paint had been applied to them, which covered some stains of mammalian blood. The paint had been carelessly laid on as if done in a hurry, or the paint had not been properly mixed, leaving tracks of the brush visible to the eye. He found blood on both sides of the lining boards of the boat. There must have been a large quantity on the flooring boards of the hut, as the boards were saturated with it. The stains were mammalian blood—most probably human blood. It was not the blood of fish, or a pig, or a bullock. It was probably not the blood of a sheep. The blood on all the articles was of the same kind.

    To Mr Clarke: He thought it was most probably human blood because the corpuscle was of the size of human blood. The corpuscle of a pig’s blood was much smaller than those of human blood. He could say the stains were of the same kind and probably the same age from the analysis of bloodstains which he had in his possession of known age. The bloodstains would undergo a change with time. He could distinguish between bloodstains six weeks and six months old. Salt water would dissolve blood. The blood on the boards of the boat were not dissolved.

    Ah Lun, who gave his evidence through an interpreter, Jimmy Ah Chin, deposed to having known Ah Won for 17 years, the last seven of which he worked with him at Yamba, his wages being £35 a year. Witness first met accused at Grafton about six months ago. He employed him to work in his garden a week before Christmas, and he came down in the Woolwich on a Friday. Witness never saw any money with him. Accused asked him for a job in Grafton, saying he had no money. Witness went to Grafton on the 6th January. Previous to going he got a P.O.O. from Sydney for £19 for vegetables. In getting the order cashed at Yamba he gave the assistant postmaster £1 with it and received two clean £10 notes, which he gave to Ah Won for wages. About a week previously he had paid Ah Won another £10. On the evening before going to Grafton he gave Ah Won two more £10 notes and three £5 notes to take care of while he was away, also £2 in silver for change, and £3 in other silver in a box. Witness recognised one of the notes produced in Court as one of those he received from the postmaster and gave to Ah Won. When smoking opium he had dropped a little in one corner of it, and recognised the mark. He had not seen it since he gave it to Ah Won until it was produced in Court. He had told him to continue working until his return. In Grafton he received a letter, but did not know who it was from. On returning on the 18th there was no trace of Ah Won or accused. Witness had never offered to sell his garden to accused. On his return he found the mosquito curtains torn. He saw the bloodstains on the floor, curtains, bedding, and other articles. There were none of these stains on them when he left. He identified the Chinese coins found on the accused in New Zealand as the property of Ah Won, he having had them for years. He had a rifle, which accused took to go shooting. He had not seen the rifle since his return.

    At this stage the hearing was adjourned until Friday morning.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Clarence and Richmond Examiner, Tue 11 Mar 1902 25

THE YAMBA MYSTERY
———◦———
PERA [sic] BEFORE THE COURT.
Accused Committed.
————
THIRD DAY—Saturday.

    Edward Blanch hotelkeeper at Palmer’s Island, deposed that on the 18th January accused obtained from him change of £5, in gold. Accused was dressed in a light suit, and wore a straw hat.

    Charles Phillips, storekeeper, saw accused at the Palmer’s Island wharf about the middle of January. Accused asked when the steamer was coming down. Witness replied that it might be about 11 or 12 o’clock. Accused, on being asked where he was going to, replied that he was going home to his country. Accused said he had plenty of money, and put his hand in his pocket and showed a roll of notes, and a quantity in a tin. Accused said that he had £300 altogether. Accused had his clothes in a chaff bag. Accused also said that he earned his money by working for it. Witness was dressed in black trousers, with a brown felt hat on.

    Henry Payne, aged 16, saw accused the day that he was going to Sydney; he was sitting on the wharf. While engaged in conversation, Constable Brown was coming down in the direction of the wharf, and accused went away and hid in the mill.

    Captain McAuley, pilot, said on the 10th January it was high tide at 8.40 pm. It would be low water in six hours from that time. The wind was south, light, fine. If a body had been placed outside the training wall it could have been carried out to sea. The scour at the Heads would be greater than at the Hawkesbury or Port Jackson. January is a bad month for sharks. Witness had seen them on the bar as thick as a shoal of mullet.

    Sergeant Wells deposed that since accused has been in the Maclean lockup he was under his charge. Accused made a voluntary statement on Friday. He said that he wanted a lawyer to explain how he came by the £29 found in his possession. He said that he sold two cows and two calves. One cow and two claves were sold to Fred Parnell, at Swan Creek, and the other cow to a Smith, at Swan Creek for £6. He also sold a horse, saddle and bridle at Thompson’s hotel for £3. He got £12 in wages, and money from Yet Wah about two weeks before he went to work at Yamba. He got 15s at Christmas, and a shirt of the value of 3s, as compensation for his services with Ah Lun, together with £1 16s. He also got £1 from a man named Thompson. He had £29 on him before he left Yamba for Sydney. He worked for about 18 months with Mr Egan, of Grafton, for 10s per week, and some times £1 per week, and at the end of the 18 months he got 7s per week. He sold a sewing machine for £7 or £8. He had saved about £15 when he left Mr Egan. He bought the machine out of the money he saved, which he had in the South Grafton Savings Bank. At the time he made the statement he was charged with stealing a rifle and £3 in money. The charge of murder had not been made against him then.

    Charles Smith, of Waterview, recognised accused. Witness was at Yamba, at Black’s hotel, and saw accused there on 13th January. He told witness that he was working for two Chinamen. Two or three days previous a little girl came to the Chinaman’s garden, and one of the Chinamen coaxed her into the hut. The girl came out crying, and the Chinaman gave her two watermelons to pacify her. In consequence of what happened, the Chinaman became afraid, and left by boat for Sydney on the 11th January. Accused expressed surprise at the police not taking the matter up. Whilst at dinner accused said that he wanted a good dinner, and did not care it cost him £100. When he finished dinner he paid Mrs Black in four threepenny bits. On the 15th Mrs Black gave witness a £10 note, two £5 notes, two small cheques, and the balance of £30 in gold and silver, to take to the Post Office to obtain a money order.

    At the close of the Crown’s evidence, Mr Clarke intimated that he would not call evidence for the defence. Accused was then committed for trial to the Grafton Circuit Court on the 22nd April.

    Accused was then charged with stealing £40, the property of Ah Lun. Mr Dowling asked for a remand till next Thursday, which was granted.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Northern Star, Wed 12 Mar 1902 26

THE YAMBA MYSTERY CASE.
————
SECOND DAY—Friday.

AH LUN, recalled, deposed the Ah Won used to keep his money in a small box underneath his pillow. He kept Chinese coins also in the box, the same as found on accused when arrested.

    Sick Chow, a gardener at Grafton, deposed: Saw at Yamba early in January and saw Ah Lun and Ah Won also. Saw Ah Lun giving Ah Won two £10 notes for wages. The notes were new ones, one now produced was like one of the notes paid over.

    Yet Wah, gardener, at Grafton, knew accused for the past two years. He left witness’ employ about the middle of December last, and was paid 12s when he was going away. Accused had no other money. Witness paid accused in all about £4.

    Daniel Howell, postmaster at Yamba, deposed that a remittance came to him in January for £50 to meet the demands of the office. The money was made up by two £10 notes on the Commonwealth Bank, four £5 notes, and the balance in £1 notes. Witness came to Mclean Post Office on January 2, and left Charles Tollow in charge at Yamba. The remittance of £50 was left with Tollow, and when he returned the two £10 notes had been paid away in the ordinary course of business. Witness knew accused, and on the 11th January the latter came to the Post Office seeking to exchange gold for notes.

    Charles Tollow, at present in Drake Post Office, was in the Yamba Post Office early in January. Two £10 notes were paid out to Ah Lun for a money order that came that morning for £19. On the order being presented witness gave two £10 notes, and received a single note to make the difference. On Saturday, the 11th January, accused came and asked for gold in lieu of notes to the value of £20. On looking witness could only find three sov[ereign]s, and gave them for three notes. Witness had a conversation with Peera about the 2nd January. Peera told witness that when he came to Yamba he was hard up, and that was how he was working for a Chinaman, and as soon as he earned a few pounds he would leave. Witness was subsequently told by Peera that Ah Won had gone to Sydney,, and witness expressed surprise, and accused said that Ah Won had got tired of it. Peera said that he was lonely, and if Ah Lun did not come back he would go too. Accused also said that he might buy the place if he could purchase it for £40 or £50. Witness said that he supposed Ah Won had taken all the money away.

    Jessie McDermid, 13 years of age, living with her parents at the Lake, knew accused and Ah Lun. Witness remembered hearing Peera say that he had no money, and a few days afterwards he said he had £40. Her brother said he did not believe him, and accused pulled out a roll of notes. He had silver at the time rattling in his pocket. Witness asked accused where he got it, and he replied that a good friend gave it to him. Asked him where Ah Lun had gone, and he replied that he had gone up that way (pointing in the direction of Palmer’s Island).

    Donald McDermid, 11 years of age, corroborated the evidence given by his sister, the previous witness, adding that when he was coming home from school in the company of three other boys accused called out, ‘I had hard luck,’ and on being asked why, he said, ‘When I was putting the pigs in the stye one pig tried to cross the road and I tapped it on the nose with a stick and it fell down.’ Witness saw the pig at the back door lying down hurt, and advised that accused ought to kill it. He did so by sticking it under the left leg with a knife. Witness helped him. Accused turned the pig over and the blood ran away on the ground at the back of the house. Witness said that he was going to clean and salt it.

    Hugh McDermid deposed:—About 3 o’clock on the 11th January he was passing Ah Lun’s and met accused, who asked when the steamer was going to Sydney.

    C McDermid deposed that he went to Ah Lun’s on business, and asked accused where Ah Lun was. Accused replied that he had gone to Sydney for the Chinese Christmas. Accused then asked for the loan of £10 to buy Ah Lun out. Witness replied, that the amount would be insufficient, and accused replied that he had £20, witness said, ‘though you had no money when you came here,’ Accused replied that a friend sent it from Grafton.

    Mary McDermid deposed that on the 6th January she heard high words at Ah Lun’s place, and saw accused run out of the hut, pick up a heavy stick and run inside again. She could not understand what accused and Ah Won were quarrelling about. On 13th of January she saw a large number of sharks tossing something about in the harbor; never saw sharks so numerous before, nor since.

    R Powell remembered riding past Ah Lun’s on or about the 10th January, at 5 o’clock in the evening; saw accused in the garden with a hoe, coming towards Ah Won, the latter wielding a pitchfork. They were talking loudly. Ah Won said “You do; you do.” They then walked towards the hut. In returning from Yamba later in the evening he saw accused standing near the tank at Ah Lun’s. Did not see Ah Won then nor since, though he passed daily. Subsequently witness had a conversation with accused, the latter saying he was restless, and could not sit down or rest anyhow. On the 14th January asked accused where Ah Won was. At first accused said he had gone to Grafton, and afterwards that he had gone to Sydney, India, or China. Accused inquired as to the best means of getting on the steamer for Sydney.

    D Tulloch gave evidence to the effect that accused bought a suit of clothes and paid for them with a £10 note.

    W Hewitt stated that he had a drink with accused at Black’s hotel, the drinks being paid for with a £10 note.

    Albert Cronin remembered accused showing him and some other lads a roll of notes and a quantity of silver.

    G Carr said accused told him that the mad Chinaman (meaning Ah Won) had gone to Sydney.

    Charles Corn was fishing in the Oyster Channel on the night of the 11th January. A fire was blazing about 1o’clock on the Yamba side. On retuning at daylight he saw a man coming from the fire towards the water, who called him and asked to be put across the channel. He recognised accused as the person. On that occasion he was shaved.

    Wm White steward of the Kallatina, said the accused joint the steamer at Palmer’s Island on the 18th January. That night accused frequently started up with a cry, and witness asked him if he murdered anyone. He replied that he could not sleep, and went on deck. Next day accused asked witness if he could give him notes for silver, and inquired the best way to get to Ceylon.

    The case was adjourned till Saturday.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Queanbeyan Age, Wed 12 Mar 1902 27

THE YAMBA MURDER.
————
THE CINGALESE COMMITTED.
————

    Cornelius Peara, the Cingalese who was charged with the murder of Ah Won at Yamba on January 10, was on Saturday committed for trial at the Grafton Circuit Court on 22nd April. The case lasted three days, and a large number of witnesses were called, who gave circumstantial evidence against the accused.

    The case was one of the most important ever tried in the State, as there is no direct evidence of the murder, and the body has not been found, nor is it likely to be. The murder is supposed to have been committed at night in the Chinaman’s hut, and the body taken into a boat and put in the river, or taken out to sea and eaten by sharks.

    The evidence was that the accused and deceased were seen fighting at dusk on the day of the supposed murder. Deceased’s bed, mosquito nets, the floor of his hut, his boat, sails, &c, were covered with blood.

    Mr W[illiam] M[ogford] Hamlet, 28 Government Analyst, gave evidence that most probably it was human blood.

    The motive for the crime appeared to have been plunder. Accused, it was alleged, was poverty-stricken before the murder, but afterwards he was seen to have plenty of money.

    There is great excitement locally over the case.

    Mr Septimus Dowling, instructed by the Crown Solicitor, prosecuted for the crown; Mr Clarke appeared for accused. On a further charge of stealing from the deceased, Ah Won, £40, the property of Ah Lun, the accused was remanded until Thursday next.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Fri 14 Mar 1902 29

THE YAMBA CASE.
———◦———
PEERA CHARGED WITH STEALING.
————

Maclean, Thursday.

    In connection with the Yamba case the charge against Peera of stealing £40, the property of Ah Lun, from the missing Chinaman, Ah Won, at Yamba, on or about January 10 last, was heard before the PM, Mr Fitzhardinge, at the Police Court to-day, and lasted till 7 pm. Mr Dowling appeared for the Crown and Mr Clarke for the accused. Twenty-five witnesses were examined, most of them witnesses who gave evidence in the charge of heard last week. Fresh evidence was adduced. Accused was committed for trial at the Circuit Court to be held at Grafton on April 22.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Australian Town and Country Journal, Sat 15 Mar 1902 30

THE YAMBA MYSTERY.
————

    MACLEAN, Saturday.—Cornelius Peara was again before the court yesterday on a charge of the murder of Ah Won, a Chinese, on or about January 10, at Yamba.

    Ah Lun, recalled, stated that Ah Won kept his money in a box under his pillow, in which he (witness) had seen the money and the Chinese coins (produced), which he identified.

    Sick Chow deposed to being present when Ah Lun paid £20 to Ah Won early in January. Accused was in his hut at the time.

    Yet Wah, of Grafton, gave evidence, refuting the accused’s statement that he had given accused £12.

    Daniel Howell, postmaster at Yamba, deposed to receiving two £10-notes in a remittance from Sydney on January 2. Theses were paid out by the assistant in his absence on January 15. He received a £10-note from Mrs Black, similar to those received from Sydney.

    Charles Tollow, the assistant postmaster at Yamba, deposed to the arrival of the £10-notes, which he paid to Ah Lun for an order the same day. On January 11 the accused came to the office and asked to exchange £20 in notes for gold or silver. Witness had exchanged three sovereigns for notes some days previously. Accused told witness that he was hard up, and that was why he worked for a Chinaman. One day he saw accused at the gardens, and he stated that Ah Won had cleared out, and he might buy the garden from Ah Lun, as he supposed Ah Lun would clear, too, when Ah Won had gone.

    Alice Skeed, Jessie McDermid, and Donald McDermid deposed to conversations with the accused, who was short of money prior to January 10. Two of the latter witnesses deposed to seeing accused and Ah Won on January 9. On the 11th accused gave them a message for Alice Skeed, and stated that he could not satisfy her without money, and he had none before, but had plenty now. He pulled out a bundle of notes, among which were two £10-notes and four fivers. In answer to the questions of witnesses, the accused said that he had got the money from a good friend the previous night. He also stated that AH Won had gone away towards Palmer’s Island. He gave evasive answers to other questions.

    Clarence McDermid deposed to going to the Chinaman’s hut for a melon on the after of Friday, January 10. He saw both Ah Won and accused there. He never saw Ah Won afterwards.

    Richard Powell deposed to witnessing a quarrel between the accused and Ah Won late one afternoon, the date, he believed, being January 10. Accused had a hoe, and Ah Won a fork. No conflict took place at the time. Witness never saw Ah Won afterwards. Other witnesses gave evidence of disparaging remarks made by accused about the Chinamen, whom, he said, he would knock over the head with a gun which he had in his possession if ever he had a row with them.

    Mrs H McDermid deposed to hearing quarrelling at the Chinaman’s hut on January 6. On the 13th she saw in the harbor a great number of sharks splashing and tossing about one place for some time. Evidence was given by several witnesses of accused making inquiries on January 10, and subsequent dates, as to when steamers left for Sydney, and where he could join them; also evidence of various statements made by accused of Ah Won’s whereabouts, and the reasons for his departure. Other witnesses gave evidence of accused changing one £10-note in a store at Yamba on January 11, and another at a hotel on the 14th, both notes being sworn to as similar to one produced and traced to Ah Won’s possession. Several witnesses also deposed to accused saying he had no money prior to January 10, and had a large sum afterwards. Evidence was likewise given that on January 17 accused accidentally killed a pig in a garden, which was bled there.

    J Barber deposed that on the night of January 10 he called at a hut to deliver bags to Ah Won, whom he called out loudly, without response. On going to the shed accused came out, and shut the door of the hut, and took the bags.

    Evidence was also given as to Peara’s presence and movements at Palmer’s Island on the morning of January 18. Peara told one witness that his name was “Jimmy,” and that he came from Grafton, being over-carried to Yamba, by mistake.

    Henry Pane deposed to the accused evading the local policeman at Palmer’s Island, while he was waiting for the steamer to arrive.

    Captain McAuley, pilot at Clarence Heads, deposed to the night of January 10 being fine, at the heads. A boat could be pulled in the bay with safety. The high tide on the evening was at 8.40. There was a strong ebb tide, which was sufficient to carry the body out to sea, unless it was well weighted. The evidence was then concluded, thirty-five witnesses having been examined, each one of whom added a link to the remarkable chain of circumstantial evidence. The accused reserved his defence, and was committed for trial at the quarter sessions at Grafton, on April 22. The accused was then charged with stealing £40, the property of Ah Lun, and was remanded.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Clarence and Richmond Examiner, Sat 26 Apr 1902 31

GRAFTON CIRCUIT COURT
————

THIS Court was opened on Tuesday, before his Honor Judge Heydon. Mr RJ Browning acted as Crown Prosecutor; and other members of the Bar present were Messrs Garland, Sheridan, Ackland, and McArthur. Mr d’Apice attended from the Crown Solicitor’s office, and Mr CA White acted as associate. There was an unusually large number of witnesses and the general public, by reason of the importance of the cases on the calendar.

————
THIRD DAY—Thursday.

GRAFTON CIRCUIT COURT.
————
(Continued from Page 3)


Cornelius Peera was then charged with stealing £40, the property of Ah Lun, at Yamba, on January 10th. He pleaded not guilty, and was defended by Mr Clark.

    Jury—John R Campbell, Walter J Capp, John McNab, Wm J Harvey, Chas Lee, Jas Mulligan, Donald McPhee, Chas Cavanagh, TG Campbell, HJ Gulliford, Thos Egan, Angus Stewart. The Crown challenged two jurors.

    The evidence in this case was fully given at the time of committal, and was in great measure identical with that given in the last case. Peera, who suddenly left the district, was arrested in New Zealand, when a sum of money was found on him. The Crown case was that the finding of this money on accused was not consistent with his financial position before he left. This and other facts were adduced by the prosecution. A large number of witnesses were in attendance to give evidence, and the hearing was not concluded when the Court adjourned last evening.

    Evidence for the prosecution was given by Ah Lun, Mary, Jessie and Donald McDermid, D Howell, Senior-constable Wells, Constable Redman, Alice Skead, Doris Millar, Arthur Holt, John Moorhead, H Bache.

    At 9.50 pm the Court adjourned till 10 am to-day.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Mon 28 Apr 1902 32

CIRCUIT COURTS.
————
A HEAVY SENTENCE.
————

Grafton, Saturday.

    At the Circuit court to-day Cornelius Peera, a Cingalese, who yesterday was acquitted of the murder of Ah Wun at Yamba in January last, was arraigned for stealing £40 from the dwelling of Ah Lun, who, with Ah Wun, conducted a garden at Yamba. About 40 witnesses were examined for the prosecution, the evidence showing that Ah Lun, who went to Grafton on a visit in January last, left the money with Ah Wun. On returning he found that Ah Wun and the accused, who had been in their employ, were missing. Bloodstains were found in the hut and various places around, leading to the suspicion that foul play had taken place. Ah Wun’s body could not be found, though there was strong presumptive evidence of murder. A £10 note that Ah Lun paid Ah Wun for wages was identified as having been cashed by the accused, who, prior to Ah Lun going to Grafton, had no money, but shortly after showed a roll of notes corresponding exactly with those left by Ah Lun with the other Chinaman. Accused changed all the notes into gold or single notes, and stated that he was going to Ceylon. He was arrested in New Zealand.

    His Honor summed up strongly against the accused, dwelling forcibly on the probable fate of Ah Wun, and the silence of the accused respecting the bloodstains found in the hut.

    Accused made a statement to the effect that he obtained the money by gambling.

    The jury returned a verdict of guilty, and his Honor in passing sentence told accused that he had no doubt that he (accused) stood in the dock a murderer, but by the merciful provision of the law had escaped the penalty attaching to a capital offence. He found that the crime of which accused was convicted was of the most aggravated character, and the highest penalty provided by the law was inadequate punishment. He sentenced accused to seven years’ penal servitude, the highest penalty prescribed by law for the offence.

    This concluded the criminal cases.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Clarence and Richmond Examiner, Tue 29 Apr 1902 33

GRAFTON CIRCUIT COURT
————
FIFTH DAY—Saturday.

THE case of Cornelius Peera, charged with stealing £40 from a Chinaman named Ah Lun, at Yamba, on 10th January last. Mr Clark appeared for accused.

    Further evidence for the prosecution was given by Richard Powell, Joseph Barber, Hugh McDermid, Captain McAuley, David Tulloch, George Carr, Albert Cronin, Clarence McDermid, William A Hewitt, Patrick Murphy, Charles Phillips, Edward Blanch, Henry PayneWilliam White, Loftus Mitt, Jas R Mallam, Mr Hamilton (Government analyst), Matthew Egan, Chas Smith, Sub-Inspector Johnson.

    The deposition of Mrs Black, who was too ill to attend, was read by consent of accused’s solicitor.

    The evidence for the Crown was exceedingly lengthy, and occupied from early on Friday to 2.45 pm on Saturday.

    Accused made a statement from the dock to the effect that about the middle of last December he won £70 by gambling. Of this he lost £30 the following night, but subsequently won some of the lost money back again. He took the money to Yamba, and went gambling again, losing £10. On the next night he went back again. Found that if he kept the money about him he would lose it by gambling. About a week after he went to Palmer’s Island to put the money somewhere for safety. He was preparing to go to New Zealand, and went back to Palmer’s Island to get the money, and wanted it in gold. He never stole any money from the Chinamen, nor did he know they had any beyond that there were 6d and two halfpennies in a locker, which during the time he was there had increased to 7s. On one occasion he took 2s from the locker, but replaced it, and the 7s was there when he left.

    For the defence, Stephen Green deposed that on one occasion accused showed him a £10 note and a considerable quantity of silver.

    His Honor explained that to constitute a crime of stealing from a dwelling, it must be proved that at least £5 had been extracted. The circumstances of this case were rather peculiar, and required very detailed evidence to be given with great particularity. On the 6th of January last Ah Lun left his home at Yamba and came to Grafton, leaving £40 in cash, which he entrusted to Ah Wun to take care of. The money consisted of two £10 notes, three £5 notes, and £4 in silver and a £1 note. There was no doubt that the missing money was stolen there were only two men left in the place, one of whom was the man to whom he entrusted the money when he returned at the end of a fortnight the money was all gone, so that the charge of stealing money from a dwelling was clearly proved. The question was who did it, and investigation naturally turned on the two men who were left in the hut, who had both disappeared. Consequently the case resolved itself as to the proceedings and probabilities respecting these two men; did either of them steal it, or, if so, whom? Ah Wun appeared to be a man of very good character, and Ah Lun was acquainted with him 18 years, and they always got on well together. That he found him honest is shown by the way he entrusted him with the money. During the eight years he had been under the jurisdiction of the police there had been no complaints against him, and he was described by witnesses as being a jolly man, also hard working and industrious. On the other hand, accused did not stay regularly in one place or have any fixed employment, but went from one job to another, and admitted he was a gambler. He went to Yamba under circumstances that indicated poverty, and was badly dressed, and represented to a large number of people that he had no money. It was possible that men of the class to which accused belonged would plead scantily of money having plenty of it; but when accused had money afterwards he was not slow in showing it or spending it. It was perfectly true that accused was acquitted on a rule of law from a charge of murder, which is an illustration of the general rule that it is much better to allow a number of guilty men to escape than that an innocent man should suffer. When the charge is the capital one of murder it is laid down that it is better, before running the terrible risk of convicting an innocent person, to allow several guilty ones to escape. On the charge of murder accused could never again be put on his trial for the murder of Ah Wun, but the jury may consider the probability of having killed him; they were not debarred from considering this, though he was acquitted on the charge of murder. If they thought that accused attacked and injured Ah Wun they were not debarred from acting on that belief. On the day Ah Lun left for Grafton a witness heard accused and Ah Wun quarrelling in the hut, and on accused running out of it he was seen to pick up a stick. So that a very short time elapsed after Ah Lun’s departure till the men got on bad terms. Shortly after accused sent a message to a girl at Grafton to come to Yamba, and she came down in company with another girl. Accused did his best to ingratiate himself with the girl, but exhibited a good deal of unscrupulousness. He set the girls down at table and treated them to fruit of various kinds. Presumably Ah Wun was away at this time selling vegetables, as he would not have allowed this to be done, and it was probably acts of this kind that caused the quarrels between them. After giving the girls fruit, accused asked if they would like any money, and took 2s from a drawer to give them. If the jury believed that accused took this money, there was a charge of larceny proved, as accused had no right to take any of this money. Notwithstanding what was said by the Crown, he did see that there was any impropriety on the part of this young girl, it may be that she made too ready an acquaintance; it may be accused had designs upon her; but her conduct did not show that she had been guilty of any impropriety. It seemed accused had designs on her; he told others about her, showing what thoughts were in his mind. He had sent her presents, and one could understand what his thoughts were. He told one of the McDermids that this girl had come down to see him; that he wanted to kiss her, but she would not let him, as there were others present. He said nothing would satisfy her but money, but he had none to give her. Two days later Jessie McDermid passed the place, when accused bought a quart of milk, and there was a great change noticeable in his mind. His conversation about this girl previously had been one of despondency; that she was out of his reach, as he had no money to give her. But this changed to exultation and pride, as he had money, and wanted Jessie McDermid to tell this girl that he had got the money. Jessie McDermid did not know what he meant, and refused to deliver his message, and he then gave her and her brother 1s to deliver the message. He then showed them a sum of money, including £10 and £5 notes, while he rattled some silver in his pockets. Accused’s whole demeanour was quite different from what it had been previously, and he did not then appear to be the sort of man that had money in his pocket and say nothing about it. Up to that time Ah Wun had been going about his usual business. There was evidence of a quarrel between him and accused on the 6th, and this may have been followed by others until the 10th, on which day Richard Powell, who was passing, saw the two men in the afternoon. Accused was then advancing towards Ah Wun with something like a hoe. Ah Wun was heard to say “You do, you do.” These facts are significant, as showing that there was something like conflict between the men. This was the last time Ah Wun was seen alive by anyone in this world, except by accused, and it was the last time in all probability that anyone will even [sic–ever] see him. Powell, when returning, saw accused standing outside. Another witness called about dusk at the hut and called out loudly for Ah Wun, but received no answer. He was about to leave when accused put his head out of the hut, and came out stealthily, keeping his hand on the door as he emerged and closing it behind him. It was fair presumption that Ah Wun was not there at the time. The disappearance of Ah Wun was narrowed down to from 4 or 5 pm and dusk on that day. They would ask why or how he disappeared. It was not his life or character for 18 years to leave without leaving a sign. How did he go away in such a short time or in such a quiet manner, or so secretly, that no one had been able to see him from that day to this? He had made no preparations for leaving, and accused said the reason of his going was on account of his conduct with a female. Accused had been seen in a menacing attitude, with a weapon over Ah Wun that might have killed him. He expressed regret that he had no money to secure the goodwill of a girl, and on the 10th January he is seen quarrelling with Ah Wun, and threatening him with a hoe when going to the hut in the afternoon. A little later Ah Wun was called several times, but made no answer, and was never again seen. The boat was rarely used; but it had been used that night, as one of the neighbours the previous day saw it well up on the skids; next day it was much lower down the skids, showing it had been used during the night. Next day accused runs out unable to control his feelings, and in his excitement sends a message to the girl telling her “Charlie” has got money and boasting he had £40. This amount correspond with the amount alleged to have been stolen, and this was a strong feature in the case. He remained for some time, and left for Sydney on the 17th, and on the 18th Ah Lun returned home from Grafton, reaching the hut late, and next morning found blood stains that were not there when he left. He found a large patch on the floor that was sodden with blood; there was blood on the mosquito net, bed, pillow, box, door, and in other parts of the hut which was not there before. Blood marks were found on the floor of the boat, mast, sail, one of the oars, and on the planking of the boat. Could the events of the 9th, 10th and 11th be reasonably connected with the disappearance of Ah Wun? Did these circumstances point to Ah Wun as being the man who stole the money? Accused had made statements to various people who asked him what became of Ah Wun, and he said he had gone to Grafton, to others he said to Sydney to keep a Chinese New Year. In conversation with the McDermids, who asked him where he got the money, he said a friend gave it to him the night before. The lad McDermid asked him where Ah Wun had gone, and he pointed in the direction of Palmer’s Island, and on the lad asking how, he said in the cart, but being told the cart was in the shed, he said nothing further. At this time he was a murderer; had blood on his clothes, figuratively speaking, on his hands, and felt he had a guilty conscience. Accused cashed a £10 note that Ah Lun had paid to Ah Wun, and this Ah Lun said had a stain of opium on it. This note was produced, and the Government Analyst testified positively that there was an opium mark upon it, thus identifying it as the note Ah Lun paid Ah Wun. This was not one of the notes that accused was charged with stealing, but it had been in the possession of Ah Wun, who held Ah Lun’s money that was stolen. This was a strong circumstance, showing that money Ah Wun had in his possession had become transferred to accused, and there is no suggestion by accused that Ah Wun gave him anything, or any reason suggested why he should give him this money. Then accused began changing the appearance of the money, converting the £10 notes into singles, the others into gold, and he obtained notes for £3 worth of silver on board the steamer. They found he was diligent in doing this when he became possessed of the money. If the blood stains did not come from the man who disappeared, where did they come from? Accused made a statement, but did not mention anything about these blood stains. He had no injury about his body to account for any great loss of blood. He lived in the place all the time, and could all that blood come into the house without his knowing it? There must have been a time while he was staying there when the blood was fresh, and why did he not then report the matter to the police? He neither said anything then nor now about this blood. Evidence was given of a pig having been killed outside the hut, and the blood from it ran into the ground. He must have known about the blood, even if he did not know the cause of it, and he of all men in the world could explain about this blood, but did not do so. He reported that he was going to buy the Chinaman’s garden, to purchase a fishing net, and other things. He wrote a letter to Ah Lun, with the object, the Crown suggests, of making evidence in his own favour. There is nothing about the blood marks; there is a good deal about the reason why Ah Wun went away. Then there was his own disappearance. He inquired how he could get away by steamer, and left for New Zealand, though he made suggestions he was going to Ceylon. He went to a place he never mentioned to anyone, and not in the same direction as the country he said he was going to. When on the way to Palmer’s Island to join the steamer he saw a policeman, and hid in the sugar mill, the sight of the officer being a terror to evil-doers, but nothing of the kind to honest people. Accused seemed at times to be miserable, could not sleep or eat, and said he would die. When on the steamer he suddenly yelled out, and not being able to contain himself, was ordered on deck by the steward to prevent disturbing the passengers. The case was one that he did not think the jury would find any serious difficulty in deciding on a verdict.

    The jury after a retirement of 25 minutes returned a verdict of guilty.

    It was stated that in 1895 accused was sentenced at the Grafton Assizes to two years hard labour for an indecent assault; in April, 1898, at the Quarter Sessions, four months hard labour for stealing goods; in the Grafton Police Court, last year, he was fined £5 and £2 2s costs or three months hard labour for assault.

    Accused had nothing to say why sentence should not be passed.

    His Honor said by a very merciful provision of the law accused had escaped from the penalty on the more serious charge of murder. Had the body been found in all probability accused would have been hanged. Anyone who heard the details could entertain no doubt that accused stood in the dock a murderer. By a merciful provision of the law accused had escaped from the consequence of murder, and he thought too that it was quite possible accused was fortunate that the graver charge of robbery with violence was not brought against him. But he was liable to a heavy sentence for this offence, and under the circumstances he conceived it to be his duty impose the highest penalty the law allowed, which he felt was quite inadequate for the offence he had committed. Peera was then sentenced to seven years penal servitude.

    This concluded the criminal business.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Singleton Argus, Tue 29 Apr 1902 34

THE COLORED MYSTERY.
———◦———
PEERA CONVICTED OF STEALING.
————
STRONG COMMENTS BY THE JUDGE.
————

Grafton, Saturday.

AT the Circuit Court yesterday, Cornelius Charles, alias Peera, was found guilty on a charge of stealing £40, from the dwelling of Ah Lee, [sic] at Yamba. Over 40 witnesses were examined on behalf of the Crown, the circumstances being identically the same as in the murder charge preferred against accused, and withdrawn from the jury. In the cause of a lengthy summing up, his Honor referred to the many incriminating incidents which showed that accused must have had a knowledge of the circumstances surrounding the disappearance of the deceased Chinese, Ah Wun.

    When passing sentence of seven years’ penal servitude, his Honor said that only by the merciful provision of the law had the prisoner escaped from a very serious chance of being found guilty of murder, under circumstances which made it very probable that he would have been hung. No one who listened to the details of the present case could have any moral doubt but that the prisoner stood in the dock a murderer. He had also been very fortunate that the more serious charge of robbery with violence had not been preferred against him.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Bathurst Free Press and Mining Journal, Tue 6 May 1902 35

THE YAMBA MYSTERY.

Maclean, Monday.

    The Cingalese Peera, [sic] who was acquitted at the Grafton Assizes of the murder of a Chinese at Yamba in January, owing to there being no direct proof of the death of the missing man, and who was convicted of stealing money left in charge of the deceased by another Chinese, has made a confession of the murder.

S.S. Kallatina at Maclean, Clarence River, n.d. Image: NSW State Library collection. Reproduction: Peter de Waal
S.S. Kallatina at Maclean, Clarence River, n.d.
Image: NSW State Library collection. Reproduction: Peter de Waal

    While at Maclean yesterday on his way to Sydney by the steamer Kallatina he admitted to a warder and a policeman and others that he had killed Ah Won. He said they quarrelled, and he wanted his wages from the Chinaman with a view to leaving the latter’s service. The Chinaman, however, would not pay, and threatened Peera with his gun and tomahawk. A struggle took place on the road about dark, and he took the gun from the Chinaman and hit the latter with it, stunning him. He then dragged him to the river, close by, and drowned him in three feet of water by holding him down till he was dead. He then tied the victim’s pigtail to the stern of a boat and towed the body out to near the sea. There he cut the pigtail and let it go. He denied that the blood in the hut and the boat was the Chinaman’s, and said the police were telling lies. He also denied robbing the Chinaman, saying that the money he had was his own, and not the Chinaman’s.

    The confession confirms the general suspicion as to the guilt of Peera, but his statement as to the circumstances of the crime is discredited.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Clarence and Richmond Examiner, Tue 6 May 1902 36

CONFESSION OF PEARA.

The Cingalese Cornelius Peera, [sic] who was at the recent Assizes sentenced by His Honor Judge Heydon to seven years penal servitude for stealing money from Ah Lun’s [sic] dwelling at Yamba, but who was acquitted on a charge of murder owing to a legal technicality, has confessed to killing the Chinaman Ah Wun. [sic] The prisoner’s conscience appears to have troubled him, for he let hints drop as to his being the author of the crime but, on his way down the river on Sunday, when en route to Darlinghurst. Peera relieved himself by giving full details of the murder. According to his statement they had a quarrel, when the Chinaman took a tomahawk and Peera a rifle. In dealing blows he struck Ah Wun over the head, breaking the weapon, but whilst Ah Wun lay on the ground stunned he beat him on the head with the barrel of the rifle. He then towed the Chinaman after the boat in the direction of the entrance, where he cats him loose. There are some points of the statement that scarcely bear the semblance of truth as Peera says he did not kill the Chinaman in the hut, and could not account for the blood that was found therein. It is evident also that if he killed him he must have put the body in the boat. Another feature in the case is that robbery and not a quarrel was the motive for the murder, and Peera’s statement, while it may be accepted so far as the actual killing of the Chinaman is concerned, is hardly borne out by the facts as to other particulars. The law that should be founded on justice now precludes accused being again arraigned for murder, no matter how clear the evidence against him. It is some satisfaction to the police, especially Sub-inspector Johnson, who worked up the case in all its details with much credit, to know that they arrested the right individual for the murder, though it is regrettable he has so far escaped the penalty that attaches to his crime.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 


Charles Cornelius, Gaol photo sheet37

SRNSW: NRS2397, [3/6010, Parramatta gaol photographic description book, 1880-1930, No. 706, p. 124, R5137.


Gaol Photo Sheet - 
Transcribed Details

No. 706
Parramatta

Date when Portrait was taken: 20 May 1902

Name: Charles Cornelius
(aka Charles Peara)

Native place: Ceylon

Year of birth: 1873

Arrived       Ship: Duranda
in Colony }   Year: 1882

Trade or occupation
previous to conviction  } Labourer

Religion: R. C.

Education, degree of: R & W

Height: 5' 5¾"

Weight     On committal: 129
in lbs     } On discharge:

Colour of hair: Black

Colour of eyes: Brown

 

Marks or special features: Scar under left eye & right cheek bone. Female figure of right forearm

(No. of previous Portrait .. 9 Grafton)

CONVICTIONS

Where and When Offence. Sentence

Grafton CC

Grafton PC

Grafton PC

Grafton CC

16

12

11

26

10

  4

  1

  4

1895

1898

1901

1902

Indecent assault on a girl under
fourteen years of age

Stealing

Assault

Larceny in a dwelling

2 years H.L.

4 months H.L.

£7-2-0 or 3 months HL.

7 years P.S.

 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~


Charles Cornelius, Gaol photo sheet 38

SRNSW: NRS2397, [3/6011], Parramatta gaol photographic description book, 29 Aug 1905-11 Nov 1909, No. 908, p. 71, R5137.


Gaol Photo Sheet - 
Transcribed Details

No. 908
Parramatta

Date when Portrait was taken:19 July 1907

Name: Charles Cornelius
(aka Peara)

Native place: Ceylon

Year of birth: 1873

Arrived       Ship: Duranda
in Colony }   Year: 1882

Trade or occupation
previous to conviction  } Laborer

Religion: R C

Education, degree of: R & W

Height: 5' 5¾"

Weight     On committal: 129
in lbs     } On discharge: 144

Colour of hair: Black

Colour of eyes: Brown

 

Marks or special features: Scar under left eye. Scar on right cheek bone, female figure on right fore arm. Scar under right knee, scar on inside left ankle, 5 scars on back of right leg.

(No. of previous Portraits .. 9 Grafton; 706 Parramatta )

CONVICTIONS

Where and When Offence. Sentence

Grafton CC

Grafton PC

Grafton PC

Grafton CC

16

12

11

26

10

  4

  1

  4

1895

1898

1901

1902

Indecent assault on a girl under
14 years of age

Stealing

Assault

Larceny in a dwelling

2 years HL

4 months HL

£7-2-0 or 3 months HL. Served

7 years P.S.
Discharged from Parramatta Gaol
12/8/1907

~ ~ ~ ~ ~


Charles Williams, Gaol photo sheet 39

SRNSW: NRS1933, [3/6024], Photograph descriptions books (Foreigners), 1898-1928, No. 1514, p. –.


Gaol Photo Sheet - 
Transcribed Details

No. 1514

Date when Portrait was taken: 25-11-1907

Name: Charles Williams
(aka Peara)

Native place: Ceylon

Year of birth: 1874

Arrived       Ship:
in Colony }   Year: unknown

Trade or occupation
previous to conviction  } Cook

Religion: R. C.

Education, degree of: R & W

Height: 5' 5½"

Weight     On committal: 142
in lbs     } On discharge:

Colour of hair: Black

Colour of eyes: Brown

 

Marks or special features: Two vaccine marks left upper arm. Two vaccine marks right upper arm. Scar on right fore arm. Female figure tattooed on right fore arm. Scar on left cheek one left upper tooth missing. Scar under right knee. Scar inside left ankle. Scar back of right leg.

(No. of previous Portrait .. 9 Grafton, 706 Parramatta)

CONVICTIONS

Where and When Offence. Sentence

Grafton CC
 

Grafton PC

ditto

Grafton CC

Water PC

16

12

11

26

23

10

  4

  1

  4

11

1895

1898

1901

1902

1907

Indecent assault on a girl under
14 years of age

Stealing

Assault

Larceny in a dwelling

Stealing

2 years HL

4 months HL

£7-2-0 or 3 months HL

7 years P.S.

£2 or 21 days HL

 


 

Charles Williams, 1909

Evening News, Fri 10 Sep 1909 40

CINGALESE AT LOGGERHEADS.
————

    A Cingalese, Charles Williams, a kitchenman by occupation, was brought before the North Sydney Police Court, on a charge of inflicting grievous bodily harm on a fellow countryman, George Carta. From the evidence, it appeared that Carta annoyed Williams by tipping some ashes at a place which he had cleaned up. The accused struck Carta, and a general row followed. Subsequently, Carta found that his collarbone had been injured, and meeting Williams at Circular Quay, gave him into custody.

    Both the accused and the prosecutor are employed by a Mrs Beattie, who is the proprietress of a boarding house at Mosman. The magistrate (Mr King) committed Williams for trial.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Sat 9 Oct 1909 41

LAW REPORT.
———◦———

SYDNEY QUARTER SESSIONS.

    Samuel Jepson and John Mullane, stealing from the person; Mary Drew, stealing from the person; Jack Murray, indecent assault; Harold Herbert Bradley, forgery and uttering; Charles Williams, inflicting grievous bodily harm.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Tue 12 Oct 1909 42

QUARTER SESSIONS.
(Before Judge Backhouse and juries.)

    Mr Herbert Harris prosecuted.

A SERVANTS’ QUARREL.

    On a charge of inflicting grievous bodily harm on George Carta, Charles Williams pleaded not guilty. Both complainant and accused were coloured men. They were employed at a boarding-house at Mosman, and Carta’s collarbone, it was stated, was broken in a quarrel.

    Mr PK White appeared for the accused.

    The jury retuned a verdict of not guilty.

 


 
Charles Williams, 1915

The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers’ Advocate, Sat 31 Oct 1914 43

PARRAMATTA COURT.
———◦———
Wednesday, October 28.
(Before Mr H Fitzhardinge, SM.)


    Charles Williams, a black man, was charged, under the Police Offences Act , with, a Murray-street, Rocky Hall, wilfully and indecently exposing himself. A remand was granted till November 2. Bail was allowed, £40.

    The police asked for “substantial bail,” as they said a very serious threat had been made by the colored man against a girl.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers’ Advocate, Sat 6 Feb 1915 44

PARRAMATTA QUARTER SESSIONS.
———◦———
“The Woman Tempted Me.”
————
A Wife With a Gun.
————
Trumpery Case from “The Awksbry.”
————
Not Straight Wire.
————
Tuesday, February 2.
————
(Before Judge Rogers.)
————

    Mr N Mason was Crown Prosecutor; Mr LW Broughton, JP, CPS, Clerk of the Peace; Mr DD Henderson, JP, Deputy Sheriff.

————

A NORTH ROCKS CASE.

    Charles Williams, a colored man, was charged with exposing himself indecently before divers persons, at Murray-street, Rocky Hall, North Rocks, on October 24.

    Geo Phillips deposed that he lived close to the accused at Murray-street, Rocky Hall. His granddaughter Grace was sent at about 10 am on October 24 for some eggs. Saw Williams committing the offence complained of. Called his wife.

    His Honor: An extraordinary thing for a man to call his wife to see.

    Cross-examined: The man was misconducting himself for a couple of minutes.

    Mr Abigail: Why didn’t you jump out of the window and kick him?

    Witness: I consider that there is something else to be done for a man like that.

    Witness: I had an idea that he would expose himself.

    His Honor: Why did you send the child for the eggs then. Why did not you go with the child yourself. Why did you not see the child a part of the distance? I can’t understand—–

    Witness: I was on speaking terms with the man the day before.

    His Honor: Yet before that he had exposed himself to your granddaughter.

    Witness: I had heard about it. The girl had complained to her parents about it.

    The accused, Chas Williams (a Cingalese) denied the allegations. He had been on bad terms with the Phillips’. Had been losing chickens and fowls. Killed the Phillips’ cat. It had stolen chickens at night.

    The witness said that the efforts of the Phillips family to become musicians nearly drove him mad whilst he wanted to study matters connected with his management of his poultry farm.

    His Honor: I thought that you were going to say that the music spoilt the eggs in the incubator. However do you play a kerosene tin.

    The witness said that he did something of the kind, like others, to protest against the annoyance from Phillips’ place.

    His Honor: Perhaps you are not fond of music.

    The witness stated that these people played the music from 3 am till 10 or 11 pm.

    His Honor: Then, I suppose, they play very well, by this time.

    The accused admitted that he had been convicted of an indecent assault on a little girl at Grafton. In 1902 he was found guilty of stealing in a dwelling and received “seven years.” Served about six years.

    His Honor disallowed questions about insulting language.

    The jury retired at 2.20 pm and two hours later returned a verdict of guilty.

    Prisoner was sentenced to six months’ imprisonment, with hard labour.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~


Charles Williams, Gaol photo sheet 45

SRNSW: NRS2397, [3/6013], Parramatta photographic description book, 1914-1917, No. 1371, p. 69, R5138


Gaol Photo Sheet - 
Transcribed Details

No. 1371
Parramatta

Date when Portrait was taken: 3rd May 1915

Name: Charles Williams
(aka Charles Cornelius, Charles Peara)

Native place: Ceylon

Year of birth: 1873

Arrived       Ship: Duranda
in Colony }   Year: 1882

Trade or occupation
previous to conviction  } Bootblack

Religion: R. C.

Education, degree of: R& W

Height: 5' 5¾"

Weight     On committal: 135 lbs
in lbs     } On discharge: 

Colour of hair: Black

Colour of eyes: Brown

 

Marks or special features: Scar under left eye and right cheek bone. Nude female figure on right fore arm.

(No. of previous Portrait .. 1514 Foreigner, 706 & 908 Parramatta, 9 Grafton)

CONVICTIONS

Where and When Offence. Sentence

Grafton CC
 

Grafton PC

ditto

Grafton CC

Water PC

Central PC

Parramatta Q.S

16

12

11

26

23

15

  3

10

  4

  1

  4

11

  1

  2

1895

1898

1901

1902

1907

1913

1915

Indecent assault on a girl under
14 years of age

Stealing

Assault

Larceny in a dwelling

Stealing

Insulting words

Indecent exposure

2 years H.L.

4 months H.L.

£7-2-0 or 3 months H.L.

7 years P.S.

£2 or 21 days HL

10/- and 8/6 Costs. Bound over to be
of good behaviour for 12 months

6 Months HL

 


1     Clarence and Richmond Examiner, Sat 19 Oct 1895, pp. 3, 5. Emphasis added.

2     SRNSW: NRS2258, [3/5993], Grafton Gaol photographic description book, Nov 1894-Jun 1910, No. 9, p. 10, R5125.

3     Clarence and Richmond Examiner, Sat 16 Apr 1898, pp. 2, 5. Emphasis added.

4     Clarence and Richmond Examiner, Sat 22 Apr 1899, p. 8. Emphasis added.

5     Clarence and Richmond Examiner, Sat 1 Jul 1899, p. 5.

6     Clarence and Richmond Examiner, Tue 4 Jul 1899, p. 4.

7     Clarence and Richmond Examiner, Sat 28 Jul 1900, p. 8. Emphasis added.

8     Clarence and Richmond Examiner, Sat 10 Nov 1900, p.8.

9     Clarence and Richmond Examiner, Tue 8 Jan 1901, p. 8.

10   Clarence and Richmond Examiner, Sat 12 Jan 1901, p. 5. Emphasis added.

11   Clarence and Richmond Examiner, Sat 27 Apr 1895, p. 4.

Mr Grafton Elliott Smith.

    At the University commemoration on Saturday, Professor [Thomas] Anderson Stuart, as Dean of the Faculty of Medicine, previous to calling over the names of the candidates, said: ‘I am about to present the first Doctor of Medicine wholly educated and trained in this University. I desire to mark the occasion all the more since one of the candidates, as well as undergoing a severe examination, which he passed most brilliantly, has presented as his Thesis a scientific work on anatomy, which is certainly quite the best yet done in Australia by a man of his standing, and one of the best done at all in these lands. The work is of a purely scientific character, done for the love of the subject, and without the smallest prospect of any material gain. It is such a work as anyone ought to be proud of, and is such as gives a distinct character, and brings a good reputation to the institution where the work is done. (Loud applause). That gentleman is Mr Grafton Elliott Smith.’ (Cheers). The young gentleman alluded to is not unknown in Grafton, his father having been for several years headmaster of the Public school here, in which the first wholly educated and trained MD of Sydney University received some part of his early training. The honours so worthily gained by Mr Smith are in some degree reflected in his old school, and we hope will cause a feeling of pride amongst pupils present and to come of the Grafton Superior Public School, as well as the earnest desire to emulate his success, the result of ability well and assiduously applied.”

12   Ashburton Guardian, (NZ), Mon 27 Jam 1902, p. 3.

13   Auckland Star (Auckland, NZ), Mon 27 Jan 1902, p. 5.

14   Manawatu Standard, (NZ), Mon 27 Jam 1902, p. 3.

15   Marlborough Express (Marlborough, NZ), Mon 27 Jan 1902, p. 3.

16   Oamaru Mail, (NZ), Mon 27 Jan 1902, p. 3.

17   Poverty Bay Herald, (NZ), Mon 27 Jam 1902, p. 3.

18   The Star (Canterbury, NZ), Mon 27 Jan 1902, p. 3.

19   The Wanganui Herald (Wanganui, NZ), Mon 27 Jan 1902, p. 2.

20   New Zealand Herald, (NZ), Fri 31 Jam 1902, p. 5.

21   Wairarapa Daily Times, (NZ), Wed 12 Feb 1902, p. 3.

22   Clarence and Richmond Examiner, Tue 25 Feb 1902 p. 4.

23   Northern Star (Lismore, NSW), Wed 5 Mar 1902, p. 5.

24   The Clarence River Advocate, (NSW), Fri 7 Mar 1902, p. 4. Emphasis added.

25   Clarence and Richmond Examiner, Tue 11 Mar 1902 p. 8. Emphasis added.

26   Northern Star (Lismore, NSW), Wed 12 Mar 1902, p. 5. Emphasis added.

27   Queanbeyan Age, Wed 12 Mar 1902, p. 2. Emphasis added.

28   The Sydney Morning Herald, Thu 19 Nov 1931, p. 10.

“MR WM HAMLET.
———◦———
Scientist’s Death.
————

    Mr William Mogford Hamlet, who was Government analyst of New South Wales for nearly 30 years, died at his residence, Glendowan, Glenbrook, yesterday, at the age of 81 years.

    Born at Portsmouth, he was educated at a private school in Bristol. Science was unknown then in schools, but he gained some knowledge of chemistry and electricity from Pinnock’s “Catechism of Chemistry” and an old tattered volume of Gilbert’s “Electricity.” Visits to the laboratories of scientists strengthened his interest in the subjects. His father had out a commercial career for him, and he was apprenticed to a shipping firm in Bristol. However, he continued his studies, and attended the Bristol trade and mining school in the evenings. There he obtained high honours in science, and received the Queen’s medal for inorganic chemistry. Afterwards he gained a scholarship, which enabled him to proceed to the Royal College of Chemistry, where he studied under Valentine and Sir Edward Frankland. After an appointment as demonstrator of chemistry at the Bristol Medical School, he entered into a contract with the Bristol agents of the Peruvian Government to analyse the consignments of natural Peruvian guano, then import from the Chinchas and Guanape Islands. He next received an appointment as official public analyst for King Lynn. In 1876 he fitted up a research laboratory for a large London brewery. Later he proceeded to the West Indies as chemist and assayer for a gold-mining company. Im less than two years he was obliged to return to England owing to illness. He was advised to proceed to Australia for health reasons, and came to Sydney in a sailing ship in 1883. He was appointed Government analyst of New South Wales in 1887, and retired in 1915.

    He leaves a widow and three children.”

29   The Sydney Morning Herald, Fri 14 Mar 1902, p. 4.

30   Australian Town and Country Journal, Sat 15 Mar 1902, p. 15.

31   Clarence and Richmond Examiner, Sat 26 Apr 1902 pp. 2, 3, 8. Emphasis added.

32   The Sydney Morning Herald, Mon 28 Apr 1902, p. 8.

33   Clarence and Richmond Examiner, Tue 29 Apr 1902 p. 5. Emphasis added.

34   Singleton Argus, Tue 29 Apr 1902, p. 2.

35   The Bathurst Free Press and Mining Journal, Tue 6 May 1902, p. 2.

36   Clarence and Richmond Examiner, Tue 6 May 1902, p. 8.

37   SRNSW: NRS2397, [3/6010], Parramatta gaol photographic description book, 1880-1930, No. 706, p. 124, R5137.

38   SRNSW: NRS2397, [3/6011], Parramatta gaol photographic description book, 29 Aug 1905-11 Nov 1909, No. 908, p. 71, R5137.

39   SRNSW: NRS1933, [3/6024], Photograph descriptions books (Foreigners), 1898-1928, No. 1514, p. –.

40   Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Fri 10 Sep 1909, p. 11.

41   The Sydney Morning Herald, Sat 9 Oct 1909, p. 11. Emphasis added.

42   The Sydney Morning Herald, Tue 12 Oct 1909, p. 4.

43   The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers’ Advocate (Parramatta), Sat 31 Oct 19145, p. 4.

44   The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers’ Advocate (Parramatta), Sat 6 Feb 1915, p. 4. Emphasis added.

45   SRNSW: NRS2397, [3/6013], Parramatta photographic description book, 1914-1917, No. 1371, p. 69, R5138