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1882, Lewis Blanchfield - Unfit For Publication
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Below also see: Lewis Blanchfield, 1890,
Lewis Blanchfield, 1891,
Louis Blanchfield, 1892,
Louis Blanchfield, 1893,
Jeremiah Murphy and Louis Blanchfield, 1895,
Louis Blanchfield, 1896,
Louis Blanchfield, 1907

 

    [Unfortunately no newspaper report(s) could be found regarding Lewis, aka Louis, Blanchfield’s 1882 absconding from the hired service of Thomas Thorpe at Tillimby, near Paterson.]

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Evening News, Fri 6 Jun 1879 1

POLICE COURTS.
————

    CENTRAL POLICE COURT.—Thursday.—Before Messrs Crane, Penfold, and Connell.

    At the Water Police Court this day,

    Five larrikins, from 12 to 14 years of age, were charged with stealing several tins of preserved fish and other sundries, the property of Patrick Bonses. All prisoners pleaded guilty, and three were fined 20s each, and two others imprisoned for a short time

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Sat 7 Jun 1879 2

POLICE.
———◦———

    At the CENTRAL POLICE COURT, yesterday, the Police Magistrate was assisted in the Crime Court by Messrs Jolly, Reading, and Skarratt; in the Summons Court by Messrs Neale, Ridge, Barden, and Blair.

    The Water Police Magistrate, with Messrs Lester, Fowler, Goodridge, Solomon, Jeanneret, Butchart, Alexander, Callaghan, Smart, Charlton, and Arguimbau, adjudicated at the WATER POLICE COURT yesterday.


    William Stanton, William Cashman, Frank Knox, Andrew Lynch, and Lewis Blanchfield, disreputable looking boys of from 12 to 14 years of age, pleaded guilty to stealing three tins of preserved fish and one box of blacklead, value 14s, the property of Patrick Bowses, [sic] and were sentences—the two former to six hours’ imprisonment, and the others, being old offenders, were each fines 20s, with the alternative of seven days’ imprisonment.

 



Lewis Blanchfield
, 1890

 

Evening News, Thu 6 Nov 1890 3

SERIOUS CHARGE.
———◦———

    At the Central Police Court yesterday, before Mr C Delohery, Patrick O’Connor, Robert McCoy, Sidney John Back (alias Baxter), John Melaney, and Louis Blanchfield, were charged, on remand, with being concerned in causing the death of Samuel Stewart.

    Dr A[rthur] E[dward] Mills, demonstrator of anatomy at the University, gave evidence to the effect that he held a post- mortem examination, and described the nature of the injuries the deceased had received and the condition of the body. The cause of death, in his opinion, was compression of the brain.

    In reply to Mr TM Williamson, he said that the rupture of one of the vessels might have been caused by a blow or a fall. He knew nothing of the man being found by the side of a telegraph post. The wound was about two inches in length. He could not say whether the wound was inflicted by a fall or a blow. Deceased was a heavy man. The wound was in a prominent part of the head.

    The further hearing of the case was adjourned till later in the day.

    After the adjournment, Senior-sergeant Collins, continuing, said that deceased was supposed to have met with his death at the corner of Geogre and Abercrombie streets, and at the in quest an open verdict was returned.

    Samuel Stewart, son of the deceased, stated that he resided at 64, Harris-street, and was a laborer. His father died in Prince Alfred Hospital on the 25th of last month. The previous night he went to the hospital, and saw his father in an unconscious condition, and suffering from a wound on his head. He remained till he was put into bed, and saw his body the following morning. His father was 61 years of age. He resided at 32, Athlone-place. He was a strong and powerful man, and not given to habits of intemperance; although he was rather the worse for liquor twice in 10 weeks before he died.

    In reply to Mr FA Oliver, who appeared for Back, he said that his father was canvassing for Mr AG Taylor on the Friday.

    Constable Jacobsen stated that he was on duty in George-street on the Friday night. His attention was drawn to a man lying opposite the Cashman’s Hotel in the road on his back with his head towards the kerbstone. His coat and hat were by his side.

    Minnie Ann Matthews stated that she resided in Chamber-street. On the night of Friday, the 24th, she and another girl saw two young men rowing about the election, and about four young men pushed out into the street and were struggling in Abercrombie-street. The men were fighting with a stout-built man over electioneering matters, and she saw him knocked down. She called them a cowardly lot of dogs. McCoy and O’Connor left and got some palings, and followed the other girl and her. McCoy told her to shut up, or he would kill her. She recognised all the accused as the men who she saw on the night in question at the place.

    The witness was cross-examined by Mr TM Williamson, who appeared for O’Connor, and Mr Coy and Mr FA Oliver for Back. She stated that one blow was struck, but she could not swear by whom.

    The further hearing of the case was adjourned till noon to-day (Thursday).

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Evening News, Fri 7 Nov 1890 4

THE SERIOUS CHARGE.
———◦———

    The further hearing, of the charge against Patrick O’Connor, Robert McCoy, Sidney John Back, John Melaney, and Louis Blanchfield, of being concerned in causing the death of Samuel Stewart, was proceeded with before Mr G Delohery at the Central Police Court yesterday.

    Minnie Ann Matthews, recalled said that since giving her evidence on Wednesday she found that she had made a mistake and wished to correct it. She should have said that the affair occurred in George-street west, and not Abercrombie-street.

    Patrick James Island, a laborer, stated that he knew two of the accused. He had a conversation with O’Connor on Saturday after the row. O’Connor said that he was in a row the previous night with two Irishmen, that he insulted one of them, and one of the Irishmen rushed at his mate, knocked him down and kicked him, and the other rushed at him, but he ran away and got two half bricks. When he (O’Connor) returned the man was standing at the lamppost, and he let fly one of the bricks, hit him in the head with it, and he fell into the gutter by the side of the road. A cabman came on the scene, and he ran away.

    The Court then adjourned for luncheon. When the Court resumed,

    Mary Ellen King, a young woman, residing at 22, Athlone-place, stated that she was with the witness Minnie Matthews at the time of the row. She saw a fat man, who afterwards turned out to be the deceased man Stewart, fall down on to the road. He had blood on him. The accused were among the men she saw struggling and heard talking about fighting. All the accused were struggling with the stout man with the exception of McCoy, who came up afterwards, and whom she did not see take part in the struggle. O’Connor and McCoy chased them with palings. Back asked her not to tell that he took part in the affair, and she said that she would if she was asked to do so, whereupon he nearly choked her with his arms. She was passing Back on another occasion and he knocked her down, gave her a black eye, and kicked her in the mouth, injuring her lip.

    Henry Davis, a bookbinder, residing at 77, Thomas-street, Ultimo, stated that on October 24, at about 11.30 pm, he was passing Abercrombie-street in George-street, and saw a row. Heard cries of “blackleg” and “police,” and saw a group of about 10 men at the corner of Abercrombie-street. He was on the opposite side. He saw a stout man standing at the corner of George-street, near the hotel, pulling off his coat and hat. He laid them on the footpath, and three men walked towards Ultimo-lane. The stout man with his coat and hat off muttered something, when one of the three knocked him down on to his back without a stagger. The man did not move at all. The three men disappeared. He was quite sure that O’Connor, McCoy, Back, and Melaney were not like the men who were at the place, in height.

    Mary Helen Hannan, a married woman, residing at 14, Athlone-place, stated that on the night in question she saw the two previous female witnesses run past her gate at about 11.25 pm, followed by O’Connor, who had stones in both his hands.

    That closed the case for the Crown.

    Accused were then all committed for trial at the next gaol delivery. McCoy was allowed bail, himself in £200 and two, sureties in £100 each.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Australian Star, Mon 17 Nov 1890 5

ABANDONED PROSECUTIONS
———◦———

THE Attorney-General has declined to continue the prosecution of Henry Miller, who was recently committed to the next Court of Sessions at Kempsey on a charge of having escaped from legal custody from the public works prison at Trial Bay, and has directed that the case shall be dealt with under section 410 of the Criminal Law Amendment Act.

    A nolle prosequi has also been entered in the of Robert McCoy, who was committed on a charge of manslaughter at the Central Police Court on November 6 to the Central Sydney Criminal Court, in conjunction with Patrick O’Connor, Sydney John Black, John Melane, [sic] and Louis Blanchfield.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Evening News, Mon 1 Dec 1890 6

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.
————

    The Central Criminal Court opened at Darlinghurst to-day before his Honor the Chief Justice, Sir Frederick Darley. Mr Coffey prosecuted on behalf of the Crown. The following is the list of cases set down for hearing: Arthur Riley, garotting and robbery; Frederick Connors, shooting with intent; William Freeman, assaulting a girl under the age of 10 years, with intent; William Scoles, shooting with intent to murder; Patrick O’Connor, Louis [sic] Blanchfield, John Melaney, and Sydney J Back, causing the death of Samuel Stewart.

JURORS FINED.

    Tho following gentlemen were each fined £3 for nonattendance as jurors: Allan McCall, merchant, Clanalpine-street, Mossmans Bay, St. Leonards; Albert Robert Gregory, saddler, Salisbury-street, Waverley; Robert Elvy, warehouseman, Macleay-street, Sydney; Michael McMahon, Blues Point, St Leonards; George Munro, Forsythe-street, Glebe; Alexander Wilson, freeholder, Point Piper-road, Woollahra.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Australian Star, Mon 8 Dec 1890 7

A FATAL ELECTION DISPUTE.
———◦———

    DURING the height of the excitement over the West Sydney election on the evening of October 24 last a number of men congregated at Cushman’s Australian Hotel, corner of George and Abercrombie, streets, when, of course, the principal subject of conversation was the triumphant return of AG Taylor, and the defeat of the calico jemmy representative, Mr John Taylor.

    The dispute waxed loud and warm, and from strong words came to heavy blows, and a general fight ensued. During this scrimmage a man named Samuel Stewart was knocked down in the street and left to lie weltering his blood. When discovered, some time, afterwards, he was found to be unconscious, and was taken to the Sydney Hospital, but though every effort was mado to restore consciousness all was unsuccessful, and the victim expired on the following morning. Investigation by the police led to the arrest of Patrick O’Connor, Sydney John Black, Louis B Blanchfield, and John Melaney, who were committed for trial at the Central Criminal Court, where they appeared to-day before his Honor the Chief Justice, charged with the offence of having feloniously slain Samuel Stewart on the date mentioned. The accused were defended by Mr Colonna Close with Mr Dwyer, instructed by Messrs Williamson and Williamson, and the Crown was represented by Mr PJ Healey.

    Proceeding.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Evening News, Tue 9 Dec 1890 8

CHARGE OF MANSLAUGHTER.
————
RESULT OF THE ELECTION.
————

    At the Central Criminal Court yesterday, before his Honor the Chief Justice and a jury of 12, Patrick O'Connor, Sydney John Back, John Melaney, and Lewis Blanchfield were arraigned upon an indictment charging them with having, at Sydney, on October 25, feloniously slain Samuel Stewart. They pleaded not guilty, and were defended by Mr Colonna-Close. Mr PJ Healy prosecuted on behalf of the Crown. For the prosecution it was stated that on the evening of October 24, the day of the recent West Sydney election, accused and deceased were at an hotel at the corner of George-street West and Abercrombie-street, where a dispute arose over the result. A fight was indulged in, with the result that Stewart was knocked down in the street. At about 11.30, some time afterwards, he was found lying unconscious, and taken to Sydney Hospital where it was found that he had sustained a fracture of the skull from which he died on the following morning, never having regained consciousness.

    For the defence several witnesses were called for the purpose of proving an alibi. After having heard the evidence, the jury found the accused not guilty, and they were discharged.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Tue 9 Dec 1890 9

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.—Monday.
(Before his Honor the Chief Justice,
Sir Frederick DARLEY.)

    Mr PJ Healy prosecuted for the Crown.

ALLEGED MANSLAUGHTER.

  Patrick O’Connor, Sydney John Back, John Melaney, and Louis Blanchfield were arraigned on an indictment of having feloniously slain Samuel Stewart at Sydney on October 25.

    Mr Colonna Close, with Mr Dwyer, instructed by Messrs Williamson and Williamson, defended the prisoner.

    The case for the Crown was that on the nicht of October 21 the deceased was at the Australian Hotel, at the corner of George-street West and Abercrombie-street. The bar was full of people, who were quarrelling over the West Sydney election, which had taken place that day. In the dispute Stewart joined, and after a few minutes those in the bar rushed out into Abercrombie-street and a fight ensued, during which the deceased wan struck and fell to the ground. O’Connor and another man left the rest, and a woman (Matthews) called out for assistance. O’Connor and the other man then threatened to kill her if she did not stop calling, and chased her home with part of a fence. The crowd ill treated Stewart for about 20 minutes. Between half-past 11 and 12 o’clock the police found Stewart lying on the road in an unconscious state with a wound on the back of his head. He was taken to the Sydney Hospital, but never regained consciousness, and died on the following day from depression of the brain consequent upon fracture of the skull.

    Two witnesses swore to having seen the prisoners amongst those who were assaulting the deceased, and two others stated that they saw O’Connor chasing the woman Matthew with a piece of a fence. One witness also stated that O’Connor had told him that he had been in a row on the night in question, and had thrown half a brick and hit a man on the back of the head. A square piece of stone was found close to the deceased.

    The prisoners in their statements to the jury, said that they were not there.

    Evidence was called to prove an alibi.

    The jury after deliberation, acquitted the prisoners.

 



Lewis Blanchfield
, 1891

 

Evening News, Sat 28 Feb 1891 10

STRANGE POISONING CASE.

    On Friday afternoon four men named Lewis Blanchfield, Edward Muir, Edward Baxter, and Frank Anderson, laborers, proceeded to Prince Alfred Hospital, and complained of severe pains in the stomach and violent retching. The symptoms were those of poisoning, and the doctor applied the stomach pump and the usual antidotes with successful results. Blanchfield appeared to be suffering most acutely, and was detained in the institution; but the others were allowed to return home. The men stated that a short time previously they had partaken of some soup in a restaurant in Harris-street, Pyrmont; and it is believed that something in it caused their illness. It will be remembered that a few weeks ago two men were similarly attacked after eating some beef steak pudding at the same place, and were treated at the hospital. The police at No. 2 station are making inquiries into the matter.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser, Thu 5 Mar 1891 11

    It will be remembered (says the Herald) that a few weeks ago two men were treated in the Prince Alfred Hospital for pains in the stomach, caused by some poison, which it was thought they had taken in the food they obtained in a restaurant. On Friday afternoon Lewis Blanchfield, of O’Connell-street, Chippendale; Edward Muir, of Dick-street, Chippendale; Edward. Baxter, of O’Connell-street, Chippendale; and Frank Anderson, of Waterloo-place, off George-street West, went to the Prince Alfred Hospital complaining of pains in the stomach and violent retching. Blanchfield was so bad that he had to be admitted, but the others were treated and sent home. These four men were, about an hour previous to their sickness, in the same restaurant as that referred to above, and it is supposed that they received the poison, which is said to have caused their illness, in the soup. The police have the matter in hand, and are making searching inquiries, but they refuse to make any disclosures.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Australian Star, Tue 14 Apr 1891 12

AN EMBRYO
PHILANTHROPIST.
———◦———
The Ways of the Wicked.
————

THE other day a rowdy young fellow named Louis Blanchfield was fined £3 or two months’ gaol for assaulting the police, and as he had not the wherewithal to pay up he was taking it out in Darlinghurst, when some of his pals thought that the case was one on which they could make an appeal to the charitable feelings of the public. Accordingly they drew up a petition, or begging list, in which it was set out that Blanchfield was in great distress, and that any contributions, however small, would be thankfully received. The matter came to the knowledge of Constable Bennet, and he kept his eye on Thomas Way, who was acting the good Samaritan at other people’s expense, and saw him collect several small sums from good-natured people. The officer, having his own ideas of where the charity came in, introduced Way to Mr O’Malley Clarke at the Central to-day, on a charge of begging alms in Campbell-street. The magistrate said that the paper produced was likely to deceive the public by stating that Blanchfield was in distressed circumstances, whereas he was serving a sentence for a most serious assault on an officer of the police. However, as the accused wish to call Blanchfield to show that he was authorised to collect subscriptions, he remanded the case till to-morrow.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Australian Star, Thu 30 May1891 13

ON REMAND.
———◦———

AT the Central Police Court to-day James Moore and James Thompson, charged with stealing in compuny, were remanded until Wednesday.

    Lewis Blanchfield, charged with stealing tumblers, will appear on the same day.

    Matthew Quinlan will come up on Monday to answer a charge of assault, and Thomas Smith, an alleged horse thief, was remanded till Friday.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Australian Star, Wed 3 Jun 1891 14

THE GLASS TRICK,
———◦———

AT the Central to-day Lewis Blanchfield was charged with having stolen two glass tumblers, valued at 2s, the property of John Trevens, [sic] of the Welcome Home Hotel. The accused entered the hotel with three companions, and drinks were ordered up. Whilst they were being supplied Trevena noticed that some glasses wore missing, and that Blanchfield was holding his hand over something in his pockets. The accused, in defence, denied that he had taken the glasses, and said that someone must have put them in his pocket for fun. The bench considered that there was doubt about the matter, and ordered Blanchfield to be detained until the rising of the court.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Evening News, Wed 3 Jun 1891 15

FRIGHTENING A LANDLORD.
————

    A man named Louis Blanchfield, on remand, was charged before Mr C Delohery, at the Central Police Court, to-day, with having stolen two glass tumblers, valued at 2s, the property of John Trevena. Constable Andrew Travers stated that he arrested accused in Gipp-street on Friday last on a charge of being drank and disorderly.

    He had the tumblers in his pocket. Accused took one of them out and smashed it on the ground, and tried to do so with the second but the constable prevented him. He after wards charged him with theft. Prosercutor, licensee of the Welcome Home Hotel, Goulburn-street, stated that on Friday after noon accused and others went into his hotel for drinks, and while there he (prosecutor) saw accused put one of the tumblers into his pocket, but he was frightened to say anything about it, owing to one of the other men threatening his life if he did, but he afterwards gave information to the police. Accused was ordered to be to be imprisoned till the Court rose.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Thu 4 Jun 1891 16

POLICE.
————

    Mr C Delohery, DSM, presided at the Central Police Court yesterday. Lewis Blanchfield was charged with having stolen two glass tumblers, value 2s, the property of John Trevena. The evidence was to the effect that Blanchfield and three others went to tho Welcome Home Hotel, Goulburn-street, kept by Trevena a few days ago, and had drinks there. Blanchfield paid for the liquors, and while they were being served he was alleged to have taken two tumblers from a shelf in the bar and put them in his pocket .The magistrate stated that there some doubt as to how the glasses got into the accused’s pocket, so he merely sentenced him to bo imprisoned till the rising of the Court.

 


 

Louis Blanchfield, 1892

 

Evening News, Wed 10 Feb 1892 17

POLICE.
————
CENTRAL.

    Fined for having rioted: Patrick Kane, 30, cabdriver, James Brown, 23, cabdriver, Michael Lillas, laborer, 17, each 20s, James Graham, 19, laborer, 2s 6d.

    For having used bad language, Louis Blanchfield, 26, dealer, was fined the usual amount.

    Ernest Humphreys, 28, pantryman, was sentenced to six months’ hard labor for having committed an act of gross indecency in the urinal at the top of Market-street.

 



Louis Blanchfield, 1893

 

The Australian Star, Tue 14 Feb 1893 18

THE UNEARNED INCREMENT.
———◦———
FREE-TRADE AND PROTECTION.
————

    A young man named Louis Blanchfield was charged at the Central to-day with having attempted to steal £1- 16s-3½d from the person of Amos Flanders. The latter said he was standing near the hustings in Belmore Park yesterday, when the accused edged up and put his hand into his (prosecutor’s) trousers pocket. He (witness) said, “Here, hold on, old man, that won't do.” Accused replied, “It’s all right, old man,” and Flanders answered, “I don’ think it is all right, you're having your hand in my pocket.” He caught hold of the prisoner, but the latter ran out of the park and sought shelter in Mr Foxall’s committee-rooms. He (Flanders) followed and caught him. At this stage the further hearing was postponed till Thursday.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Evening News, Wed 15 Feb 1893 19

AT THE SOUTH SYDNEY ELECTION.
————

    Louis Blanchfield, 27, laborer, was charged before Mr C Delohery, SM, at the Central Police Court Tuesday with having attempted to steal £1-16s-3½d and a knife from Amos Flanders. Prosecutor, an advertising contractor, was at the South Sydney election in Belmore Park Monday afternoon, and as he was leaving accused went up and put his hand into his left hand side trousers pocket. When told that that sort of game would not do accused replied, “Oh, that’s all right, old man,” after which he walked out of the park and walked into Mr Foxall’s committee room. Prosecutor waited till accused came out, when he gave him into custody. Mr S Stewart, who defended, asked for a remand till Thursday, which was granted, bail being refused.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Australian Star, Thu 16 Feb 1893 20

FREE-TRADE AND PROTECTION.
———◦———

    A youth named Louis Blanchfield, who was on Tuesday charged with having at the South Sydney hustings attempted to steal 24s from the person of Amos Flanders, was brought up to-day at the Central that his defence might be heard. He engaged counsel to show that he was employed in the free-trade candidate’s interest, and that he was simply canvassing with zeal and energy when Flanders said he caught his hand in his pocket. He assured the bench that he had never been before the court for anything so serious before, but both these assertions were upset by a stonyhearted policeman, who elicited that the poll had been declared long before the robbery, and that the prisoner had been “up” for a choice assortment of crimes. He got two months to-day.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Evening News, Thu 16 Feb 1893 21

WORKING FOR MR FOXALL.
————

    Louis Blanchfield, on remand, was charged before Mr C Delohery, SM, at the Central Police Court this morning, with having attempted to steal about 24s from Amos Flanders. The evidence taken on a previous occasion was that prosecutor was in Belmore Park on the day of the South Sydney election, and as he was leaving accused put his hand into prosecutor’s pocket and was caught in the act. Accused afterwards walked into Mr Foxall’s committee room, and when he came out prosecutor, who had waited for him, gave him into custody.

    Mr C Bull, who appeared for the defence, called accused, who stated that he was working on behalf of Mr Foxall the greater part of the day, and did not commit the offence with which he was charged, in fact he did not remember being near prosecutor. In reply to Senior Constable Slammon, accused said that the polling was all over at the time in question. He had been in trouble five or six times before for language, inciting a prisoner to resist, &c. He was, among other things, charged with manslaughter, but was acquitted. As it was his first time for an offence like that, he was sentenced to two months’ hard labor.

 



Jeremiah Murphy and Louis Blanchfield
, 1895

 

Evening News, Thu 5 Dec 1895 22

CENTRAL POLICE COURT.
————
TO-DAY’S CASES.
————

    Captain Fisher, SM, presided at the charge court.

    Jeremiah Murphy, 30, and Louis Blanchfield, 29, were charged with assaulting On Lee, with intent to rob him of £5. Prosecutor keeps a grocery store in Gipps-street and stated that on Monday evening last accused came to the shop and Murphy bought some matches. When he opened the till to give change Murphy made a grab at the contents, scattering the money on the floor. Prosecutor at once caught hold of him, and Blanchfield then struck him a blow on the head with a broom handle, knocking him insensible. His wound was dressed at the hospital. There was £10 in the till, and he missed £5 of this amount.

    Ah Wee corroborated prosecutor’s evidence.

    Senior-sergeant Collins testified to visiting the shop some time after the assault and seeing money scattered over the floor.

    For the defence, a boy named Henry Sampson swore that the disturbance arose through Blanchfield being kicked at the door of the shop by On Lee for remarking something about Europeans patronising his store. On Lee also threw a weight at him. Blanchfield then went inside and the Chinaman drew a knife to stab him. It was then that the former struck On Lee with the broom. On Lee did not fall insensible, but picked up a tomahawk. All Murphy did was to try to separate the two combatants.

    Several other boys, who were about the shop at the time of the occurrence, swore to the same story, and said there was no money on the floor. Accused were then discharged.

 



Louis Blanchfield
, 1896

 

Evening News, Fri 31 Jul 1896 23

CENTRAL POLICE COURT.
————
TO-DAY’S CASES.
————

    Mr GH Smithers, SM, presided.

    Robert Williams, 27, was charged with having insufficient lawful visible means of support, and upon the application of Senior-constable Starratt was remanded till Tuesday.

    Louis Blanchfield, 30, was charged with having assaulted William Matherson in the cells of No. 2 Police Station. Fined £2, or twenty-one days.

 



Louis Blanchfield
, 1907

 

Evening News, Thu 12 Sep 1907 24

THAT DEADLY PEA RIFLE.
———◦———
BOY KILLED AT NORTH SYDNEY.
————

    John Thomas Bushnell, 15½, who resided with his parents in Warringah-road, Folly Point, North Sydney, was accidentally shot with a pea rifle last evening, and died about an hour after.

    Bushnell and a couple of friends—John Goulding and Louis Blanchfield—left home shortly after noon with two pea rifles between them for Salt Pan Creek, Middle Harbor. When returning home and when near the suspension bridge at St Leonards, Goulding was carrying one of the rifles, that belonged to Bushnell. The former intended purchasing it, and asked Bushnell to show him how a certain part of it worked

    The unfortunate young fellow took the weapon, and when examining the barrel it went off. The bullet pierced one of Bushnell’s eyes and entered the brain. He was conveyed to his home, and a couple of doctors were immediately called in, but their efforts were to no avail.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Evening News, Tue 17 Sep 1907 25

Building the Cammeray Suspension Bridge, 1891. Image: NSW State Library collection. Reproduction: Peter de Waal
Building the Cammeray Suspension Bridge, 1891. Image: NSW
State Library collection. Reproduction: Peter de Waal

SHOT IN THE EYE.
————

    A verdict of accidental death was returned at an inquiry into the death of John Thomas Bushnell, 15, who resided with his parents in Waringah-road, Folly Point, North Sydney, and who was shot with a pea rifle on Wednesday last while near the Suspension Bridge, at St Leonards.

    The evidence was that the boy and two friends—John Goulding and Louis Blanchfield—were returning from a shooting expedition at Salt Pan Creek, Middle Harbor, when Goulding who wanted to purchase the rifle, asked Bushnell to show him how a certain part worked.

    Bushnell was showing Goulding how it worked, when it exploded, the bullet entering the right eye.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers’ Advocate, Wed 18 Sep 1907 26

THE DEADLY PEA-RIFLE.

    John Thomas Bushnell, 15½, who resided with his parents in Warringah-rd., Folly Point, North Sydney, was accidentally, shot with a pea-rifle on Wednesday evening, and died about an hour after. Bushnell and a couple of friends—John Goulding and Louis Blanchfield—left home shortly after noon with two pea-rifles between them, for Salt Pan Creek, Middle Harbor. When returning home, and when near the suspension bridge at St Leonard’s, Goulding was carrying one of the rifles, that belonged to Bushnell. The former intended purchasing it, and asked Bushnell to show him how a certain part of it worked. The unfortunate young fellow took the weapon and when examining the barrel, it went off. The bullet pierced one of Bushnell’'s eyes, and entered the brain. He was conveyed to his home, and a couple of doctors were immediately called in, but their efforts were of no avail.

 


1     Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Fri 6 Jun 1879, p. 2.

2     The Sydney Morning Herald, (NSW), Sat 7 Jun 1879, p. 3. Emphasis in original and added.

3     Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Thu 6 Nov1890, p. 5. Emphasis added.

4     Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Fri 7 Nov1890, p. 5. Emphasis added.

5     The Australian Star, (Sydney, NSW), Mon 17 Nov 1890, p. 5. Emphasis added.

6     Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Mon 1 Dec 1890, p. 5. Emphasis added.

7     The Australian Star, (Sydney, NSW), Mon 8 Dec 1890, p. 5. Emphasis added.

8     Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Tue 9 Dec 1890, p. 5. Emphasis added.

9     The Sydney Morning Herald, (NSW), Tue 9 Dec 1890, p. 4.

10   Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Sat 28 Feb 1891, p. 5. Emphasis added.

11   The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser, (NSW), Thu 5 Mar 1891, p. 7.

12   The Australian Star, (Sydney, NSW), Tue 14 Apr 1891, p. 5. Emphasis added.

13   The Australian Star, (Sydney, NSW), Thu 30 May 1891, p. 4. Emphasis added.

14   The Australian Star, (Sydney, NSW), Wed 3 Jun 1891, p. 5. Emphasis added.

15   Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Wed 3 Jun 1891, p. 5. Emphasis added.

16   The Sydney Morning Herald, (NSW), Thu 4 Jun 1891, p. 3.

17   Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Wed 10 Feb 1892, p. 3. Emphasis added.

18   The Australian Star, (Sydney, NSW), Tue 14 Feb 1893, p. 5.

19   Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Wed 15 Feb 1893, p. 6.

20   The Australian Star, (Sydney, NSW), Thu 16 Feb 1893, p. 5.

21   Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Thu 16 Feb 1893, p. 5.

22   Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Thu 5 Dec 1895, p. 6. Emphasis added.

23   Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Fri 31 Jul 1896, p. 6. Emphasis added.

24   Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Thu 12 Sep 1907, p. 6. Emphasis added.

25   Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Tue 17 Sep 1907, p. 7. Emphasis added.

26   The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers’ Advocate (Parramatta), Wed 18 Sep 1907, p. 2.