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1880, Frederick Bornstein - Unfit For Publication
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Below also see: Frederick Bornstein, 1881,
Frederick Bornstein, 1882,
Frederick Bornstein, 1883,
Frederick Bornstein and Edward O’Brien, 1885,
Frederick Bornstein and Samuel Knapp, 1887,
Frederick Bornstein and John Barnett, 1890,
Frederick Bornstein, 1891,
Frederick Bornstein and Martin Reilly, 1892,
Frederick Allen, 1899,
Frederick Bornstein, 1901,
Frederick Bornstein, 1902,
Frederick Bornstein and James McMahon, 1903,
Frederick Wiseman, 1915

 

    [Unfortunately there are no newspaper reports of Frederick Bornstein’s Aug 1880 absconding.]

 

The Sydney Morning Herald, Wed 11 Aug 1880 1

POLICE.
———◦———
CENTRAL POLICE COURT.

    Yesterday, the Bench on the Criminal side was composed of Messrs Dean, Perdriau, Reading, and Bailey; and on the Summons side, of Messrs Fremlin, Field, Lippman, Paling, Linsley, and Harwood.

    Joseph Lee, 19, William Allen, 14, and Frederick Bornstein, 14, were summarily convicted of having stolen a jacket, valued at 22s, the property of William W Cater, of Pitt-street, draper, and were severally sentenced to pay 20s penalty, or to be imprisoned one month.

 



Frederick Bornstein
, 1881

 

The Sydney Morning Herald, Sat 24 Sep 1881 2

POLICE.
———◦———
CENTRAL POLICE COURT.

Queens Theatre, [151] York Street, [West side], Sydney, n.d. Image: NSW State Library collection. Reproduction: Peter de Waal
Queens Theatre, [151] York Street, [West side], Sydney, n.d.
Image: NSW State Library collection. Reproduction: Peter de Waal

    The Police Magistrate was assisted yesterday on the Criminal side by Messrs Holborow and Lees; and on the summons side by Messrs Neale, Barden Ridge, Withers, O’Connor, Armstrong, and Davies were the sitting justices.

WATER POLICE COURT.

    In the Water Police Court, yesterday, Mr Marsh, PM, was assisted by Messrs Lester, Hunt, Goodridge, 'Bayldon, Penfold, Jenkins, Maclean, and Robinson, JsP.

    William Clarke, a youth of very forbidding appearance, and Frederick Bornstein, a boy who, though only 17 years of age, has been more than once in the dock, were charged by Detective Williams with assaulting a little boy named Henry Burgess and robbing him of £19, the property of John Burgess.

    Briefly given, the evidence in the case was this: Mr Burgess and his family only came to Sydney recently, and on Thursday morning he took £10 out with him for the pnrpose of buying furniture with it. He did not expend it, but during the forenoon handed the roll of notes to his son, to carry home to Mrs Burgees. At this time the boy and he were standing at the corner of Rowe-street and Castlereagh-street; and after he had given his son the money and left him, the prisoners came up, and began to pull little Burgess about and tickle him. Finally, Bornstein put his arms around the little boy, while Clarke took the roll of notes from his pocket, and the pair decamped. Henry Burgess at once went home, and the police were communicated with, the result being that at night the prisoners were apprehended at the Queen’s Theatre by Constable Sullivan. None of the money was found upon them. The prisoners were committed for trial at tho next Court of Quarter Sessions, bail being allowed them.

 



Frederick Bornstein
, 1882

The Sydney Morning Herald, Wed 16 Aug 1882 3

POLICE.
———◦———
CENTRAL POLICE COURT.

    Mr Crane, SM, Mr Dillon, SM, and Mr W Fowler, JP, occupied the bench yesterday.

    On the Summons side of the Court, James Radley was fined 40s for resisting the police; Daniel Dewney, shoeblack, was fined 5s for obstructing the footpath by placing his box thereon, and refusing to remove it when required. For various behaviour James Clark, William Clark, and Frederick Bornstein were sentenced to two days’ imprisonment, without the option of a fine. 

 



Frederick Bornstein
, 1883

 

Evening News, Tue 13 Feb 1883 4

Theatre Royal (Castlereagh St) destroyed by fire during Mrs Bernard Beer’s season, 1892. Image: NSW State Library collection. Reproduction: Peter de Waal
Theatre Royal (Castlereagh St) destroyed by fire
during Mrs Bernard Beer’s season, 1892.
Image: NSW State Library collection.
Reproduction: Peter de Waal

A BAD RECORD.

    At the Central police court, yesterday, a youth of 18 named Frederick Bornstein was charged with having insufficient means of support. A constable swore that he knew the prisoner for 2½ years during that time he did nothing for an honest living, but was the constant companion of thieves and prostitutes. Detective Mulqueeny deposed that prisoner was constantly at the door of the Theatre Royal. He had received frequent complaints of pocket-picking from persons who frequented the theatre. The accused disappeared for five or six weeks, and the pocket-picking ceased.

    Mr Dillon said he did noot think gaol would do prisoner any good, as he already had an extended acquaintance with that institution. Prisoner should, however, go back again for three months. Mr Dillon complained of the non-existence of a reformatory for such characters.

 



Frederick Bornstein and Edward O’Brien
, 1885

 

Evening News, Fri 30 Jan 1885 5

ALLEGED ASSAULT
AND ROBBERY.

    In the Central Police Court to-day, before Mr J Buchanan, SM, Frederick Bornstein and Edward O’Brien were charged with having assaulted and robbed Edward Bradley of 18s and a silver ring.

    Detective O’Sullivan applied for a remand for one week, as there were others implicated in the affair who are not yet in custody. The accused were remanded until Friday next. Bail was refused.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Evening News, Mon 9 Feb 1885 6

A SUSPECTED PERSON.

    Frederick Bornstein, a groom, was charged in the Central Police Court to-day with being a suspected person. The prisoner was seen in the Belmore Markets placing his hands in some ladies’ pockets. He was sentenced to six months’ imprisonment, with hard labour.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Sat 29 Aug 1885 7

POLICE.
———◦———

    At the Central Police Court yesterday, Mr Buchanan, SM, presided in the Charge division.

    Frederick Bornstein was charged with being in a public place with intent to commit a felony. Constable Duncan saw the accused picking pockets in a crowd in front of the Opera House, and arrested him. He was sentenced to six months’ imprisonment, with hard labour.

 



Frederick Bornstein
, 1886

 

Globe, Thu 20 May 1886 8

POLICE INTELLIGENCE.
————
CENTRAL.
Thursday, May 20.
(Before Mr Johnson, SM.

WATER.
(Before Mr Marsh, DSM.)

    STONE THROWING.—Louis Felix, 21, was charged with throwing stones, to the to the [sic] common danger of passengers, and had to pay 10s. or four days gaol.

    ASSAULT.—Peter Sullivan assaulted a constable whilst in the execution of his duty. For this, he has to go to gaol for two months.

    LANGUAGE.—Cornelius Cain, for using obscene language on the Corso, Manly, had to pay 40s. or 14 days gaol.

    REMANDS.—Richard Sandford, on a charge of appropriating a horse, the property of another, was remanded for one week.—Frederick Bornstein, charged with stealing the sum of 9s-6d. by a trick. Remanded for one week.

    A YOUNG VAGRANT.—John Leckenby (12), of diminutive proportions, was charged, with wandering about the streets and sleeping out at nights. Mr Marsh sent the youthful delinquent on board the Vernon.

 



Frederick Bornstein and Samuel Knapp
, 1887  9 & 10

 

The Sydney Morning Herald, Fri 13 May 1887 11

POLICE.
———◦———

    Mr Leopold Yates, DSM, presided in the Charge Division of the Central Police Court yesterday morning.

    Frederick Bornstein and Samuel Knapp, who were found last night loitering about with burglarious implements in their possession, were committed for trial at the ensuing Metropolitan Quarter Sessions.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Sat 28 May 1887 12

    The following cases are set down for trial on Monday:—

    Thomas William Gibbs, larceny; Frederick Bornstein and another, breaking into a dwelling-house; Percy Slyke, breaking into a dwelling-house; James Clarke and another, having housebreaking implements in possession; Emily Miller, breaking into a dwelling-house; Isaac Abrahams and another, attempt to break into a shop.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Tue 31 May 1887 13

METROPOLITAN QUARTER SESSIONS.
Monday, May 30.
(Before Mr District Court Judge Wilkinson.)

    Mr H Harris conducted the prosecutions on behalf of the Crown.

BREAKING INTO A DWELLING.

    Frederick Bornstein aud Charles Robinson [sic] were arraigned upon an indictment charging them with having, on the 10th May, at Sydney, burglariously entered the dwelling-house of Thomas Kean, for the purpose of committing a felony. The prisoners were defended by Mr Moriarty. The evidence showed that on the date in question the prisoners entered the house of the complainant, and that Bornstein forcibly opened the door of a bedroom. The complainant was in the room at the time, and captured Bornstein, who was closely followed by the other prisoner. Complainant was endeavouring to take Bornstein to the police station, but was assaulted by both prisoners, who managed to escape for the time, but were subsequently arrested. The jury found the prisoners guilty. From the official records of the gaol it was shown that there were a number of minor convictions against them.

    HIS HONOR, in passing sentence, said, in his opinion, passing short sentences on prisoners who had been previously convicted simply meant manufacturing criminals. He looked upon this case as a very bad case, and should treat it accordingly. He then sentenced Bornstein to five years’ penal servitude, and Robinson to three years’ penal servitude.

 



Frederick Bornstein and John Barnett
, 1890

 

Evening News, Wed 9 Jul 1890 14

PICKPOCKETS.
————

    Frederick Bornstein, 26, and John Barnett, 28, were charghed in the Central, yesterday, before Mr W Johnson, with having stolen a purse, containing £2 and a railway ticket, the property of Alfred Binbel. The prosecutor stated that he was a farmer from Blayney, at present residing at the Dog and Duck Hotel. On Monday last he met Bornstein in Webb’s Hotel. They had a drink and a walk about, and went to the Alhambra afterwards. When they were coming out they got in a crush of people, and the property was taken from his pocket. Bornstein afterwards handed him the railway ticket back. Barnett was discharged and Bornstein remanded till Friday for the attendance of witnesses.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Australian Star, Fri 11 Jul 1890 15

A CASUAL ACQUAINTANCE.
———◦———

    On the night of July 7 Alfred Binbel, a Blayney farmer, who is at present staying at the Dog and Duck Hotel, picked up a chance acquaintance in the person of Frederick Bornstein, at Webb’s Hotel. Over a glass of grog they became as chummy as if they had been lending each other money for years, and presently Bornstein proposed a visit to the Alhambra. They got into a crowd, and it was then that the prisoner sic–prosecutor] felt a hand in his pocket and a distrust of his new-found mate. On emerging from the crush Binbel missed his purse, which contained £2 and a railway ticket to Wentworth Falls. Bornstein was also missing for a time, but soon after he approached the prisoner and said, “What’s up, old man?” “You know what’s up,” said Binbel, and next moment Bornstein was in the grasp of Detective Keatinge, who needed no introduction. When the prisoner was taken the prosecutor’s railway ticket was found on him. Evidence was brought to-day at the Central to show that the prosecutor could not positively identify the accused, but his Worship declared the case proved, and sent the accused along for three months.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Australian Star, Mon 13 Oct 1890 16

THE COURTS.
———◦———
CENTRAL.
————

WATER.
————

    THROWING STONES.—Frederick Bornstein, for throwing stones to the common danger of persons passing in Burton-street, got 40s, or four days.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Evening News, Tue 14 Oct 1890 17

YESTERDAY’S COURTS.
————
WATER.

    Frederick Bornstein, 26, groom, was charged with throwing stones to the common danger of persons passing in Burton-street on Saturday afternoon. He pleaded guilty and was fined 40s, or 14 days’ imprisonment.

 



Frederick Bornstein
, 1891

 

Evening News, Sat 14 Feb 1891 18

THE COURTS.
————

NEWTOWN.


    James Bornstein, alias Frederick Bornstein was remanded until Monday on a charge of fraudulent appropriating £2, the property of Patrick Regan.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Australian Star, Tue 24 Mar 1891 19

A FRAGRANT WEED.

    Two old hands, William Thompson and Frederick Bornstein, are as well-known to the police as the magistrates of the territory, and never seem to be able to keep away from the clutches of their friends, the guardians of the peace. This time the worthy pair went into Mr Joseph Buchmayer’s sausage factory, 132 Liverpool-street, and while the people of the place were out in the back, Thompson was seen to go behind the counter and put a drawer containing some 50 cigars on the counter. Bornstein was in front of the counter, and then they both made off. Constable Dunn arrested them both—old birds in the Domain—and some of the cigars were found in their possession.

    At the Central to-day they both owned up to being in the shop, and were sent to gaol for three months with hard labor.

    Thompson, who hit Constable Dunn and kicked him, will have to do an extra three months.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Evening News, Wed 25 Mar 1891 20

THEFT AND ASSAULT.
————

    William Thompson, 40, laborer, and Frederick Bornstein, 28, groom, were charged at the Central Police Court, on Tuesday, before Mr G O’Malley Clarke, SM, with having stolen from 132, Liverpool-street, 36 cigars, valued at 7s, the property of James Buckmayer. [sic] Accused went into the shop on Monday, and prosecutor’s wife, who was in a back room, saw one of the men go behind the counter, take something, and leave. The cigars were afterwards missed. When arrested some were found on Bornstein. They were each sentenced to three months’ hard labor. Thompson was further charged with having assaulted Constable Dunne, and was sentenced to another three months’ hard labor.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Australian Star, Thu 30 Jul 1891 21

A VETERAN IN CRIME.
———◦———

    FREDERICK BORNSTEIN, who, though young in years, freely admitted that he was an “old criminal,” was charged at the Central Police Court to-day with being a vagabond with no visible lawful means of support.

    A long and varied record was proved against the accused, and it was shown that he was as bad a lot as the police records can show. A sentence of four months’ gaol was passed.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Evening News, Sat 1 Aug 1891 22

THE COURTS.
———◦———
CENTRAL.


    Frederick Bornstein, 27, on remand, charged with having insufficient lawful visible means of support, was sentenced to four months’ hard labor.

 



Frederick Bornstein and Martin Reilly
, 1892  23

 

Evening News, Mon 4 Jan 1892 24

AN EXPENSIVE MISTAKE.
————

    Frederick Bornstein, 29, groom, was charged before Mr C Delohery, SM, at the Central Police Court to-day, with having assaulted John Greaves. Prosecutor stated that he was standing in George-street, on Saturday night, listening to some people preaching when accused went up to him, and said something. He told him to mind his own business, and walked on. Accused afterwards went up to him again and struck him. Accused, who said in defence that he had made a mistake and thought that prosecutor was someone else, was fined £5, or two months.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Evening News, Mon 7 Mar 1892 25

POLICE.
————
CENTRAL.


    The following cases were remanded:

    Charles Onslow, alias Frederick Bornstein, 28, groom, charged with breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Theodore Pleym, [sic] Lord Wolseley Hotel, 196 Quarry-street, Ultimo. And stealing therein articles value £5.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Australian Star, Sat 12 Mar 1892 26

BURGLARY AT ULTIMO.
———◦———
CAPTURE BY A CONSTABLE.
————

    Two young men named Charles Onslow alias Frederick Bornstein and Martin Reilly were arraigned at the Central Police Court yesterday, charged with having burgled the Lord Wolseley Hotel, Quarry-street, Ultimo.

    The little affair occurred last Saturday morning. Constable Travers said he was on duty in Crown-road, and he saw Reilly, who on seeing him approached the hotel named and whistled. In response two men came from the verandah and on sighting the form of the policeman they made off. Chase was given, and going up Burlington-lane, Bornstein, ono of the three, dropped a coat and a bottle of brandy, while one of the others threw away something which rattled like a chisel.

    The constable caught Bornstein, who shouted out to his mates, “Stick, boys,” but witness drew his baton and told him to he quiet or he would drop it on his skull. Bornstein obediently kept silence, but on approaching the hotel endeavored to escape, the baton being flashed in the dim moonlight again with the desired result.

    The constable examined the hotel with the landlord, Theodore Flynn, and they discovered that the window had been forced up with a chisel. The till had been taken from the bar into a side room. The bottle dropped on the road was similar to a number which Flynn had in stock.

    Reilly was subsequently arrested by Detective Keatinge, who said he was a constant companion of Bornstein.

    Evidence was given that the prisoners had been seen in company in the vicinity of the hotel on the night preceding the morning of the burglary.

    Accused were committed for trial.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Evening News, Sat 12 Mar 1892 27

CAPTURE OF BURGLARS.
————

    Charles Onslow, alias Frederick Bornstein, 28, and Martin Riley, 25, on remand, were charged before Mr C Delohery, at the Central on Friday, with having broken and entered Theodore Pleym’s Lord Wolseley Hotel, Ultimo, and stolen brandy, silver, &c, to the value of about £5.

    Riley was arrested by Detective Keating. [sic] Constable Travers stated that on the early morning of the 5th he was on duty in Crown-road, Ultimo, and saw Riley near the hotel. Riley whistled, and Bornstein and another man came out of the place, and all three ran away. He gave chase, and Bornstein threw the brandy away. He caught Bornstein, and he sang out “Stick boys.” He drew his baton and threatened to strike him with it unless he behaved himself. He afterwards found that the till in the hotel had been ransacked. Some corroborative evidence having been proven, accused were committed for trial at the quarter sessions.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

National Advocate, Mon 14 Mar 1892 28

BURGLARY AT ULTIMO.
———◦———
CAPTURE BY A CONSTABLE.
————

    Two young men named Charles Onslow alias Frederick Bornstein, and Martin Reilly, were arraigned at the Central Police Court on Friday, charged with having burgled the Lord Wolseley Hotel, Quarry-street, Ultimo. The little affair occurred a week ago. Constable Travers said he was on duty in Crown-road, and he saw Reilly, who, on seeing him, approached the hotel named and whistled. In response, two men came from the verandah and on sighting the form of a policeman they made off. Chase was given, and going up Burlington-lane, Bornstein, one of the three dropped a coat and a bottle of brandy, while one of the others threw away something which rattled like a chisel. The constable caught Bornstein, who shouted out to his mates, “Stick, boys,” but witness drew his baton and told him to be quiet or he would drop it on his skull. Bornstein obediently kept silence, but on approaching the hotel endeavored to escape, the baton being flashed in the dim moonlight with the desired result. The constable examined the hotel with the landlord, Theodore Flynn, and they discovered that the window had been forced up with a chisel. The till had been taken from the bar into a side room. The bottle dropped on the road was similar to a number which Flynn had in stock. Reilly was subsequently arrested by Detective Keatinge, who said he was a constant companion of Bornstein. Evidence was given that the prisoners had been seen in company in the vicinity of the hotel on the night preceding the morning of the burglary. Accused were committed for trial.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Evening News, Tue 12 Apr 1892 29

CHARGE OF BURGLARY.
————

    At quarter sessions, yesterday, two young men named Fredk Anslow (or Bornstein) and Martin Reilly were arraigned on a charge of breaking and enteringr the Lord Wolseley Hotel, at Ultimo, and stealing therefrom one bottle containing brandy, three finger rings, and £1-5s-5½d. From the evidence given by the police it appeared that early on the morning of the 5th instant the prisoner Reilly, who was seen near the hotel, whistled, and then Bornstein and another man were observed to emerge from the side door and join Reilly, and they all then ran off. They were followed by a constable, who saw Bornstein throw a coat and bottle away, and one of the other men also threw away something, Bornstein was afterward arrested, and on being searched certain money was found upon him. The prosecutor recognised the brandy bottle as one belonging to his bar, and the denomination of the money found upon Bornstein corresponded in considerable measure with that of the money which was allowed to remain in the till when the hotel was closed on the night of the 4th.

    The case had not concluded when we went to press.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Tue 12 Apr 1892 30

METROPOLITAN QUARTER SESSIONS.
Monday.
(Before his Honor Judge Backhouse.)

    Mr WL Merewether prosecuted for the Crown.

ALLEGED BREAKING AND ENTERING.

    Frederick Bornstein and Martin Reilly were charged with breaking and entering the Lord Wolseley Hotel, Crown-road, Ultimo, on the 4th March and stealing a bottle of brandy, three finger rings, and £1-5s-5½d in money. Mr Crick appeared for the accused. The jury returned a verdict of guilty against Bornstein, and not guilty against Reilly. Reilly was discharged, and Bornstein, against whom there was a long list of previous convictions, was remanded for sentence.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Australian Star, Wed 13 Apr 1892 31

PRISONER SENTENCED.
———◦———

FREDERICK BORNSTEIN, found guilty the previous day of burglary, was yesterday afternoon sentenced to seven years’ penal servitude. Bornstein has already served long sentences under various aliases.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Evening News, Wed 13 Apr 1892 32

BREVITIES.
———◦———


    At the quarter sessions yesterday Frederick Bornstein, who on Monday was convicted on a charge of burglary, was sentenced to seven years’ penal servitude.

 



Frederick Allen
, 1899  33

 

The Australian Star, Fri 6 Jan 1899 34

ATTEMPTED THEFT FROM
THE PERSON.
———◦———
Six Months’ Hard Labour.
————

    A man of 33 years of ago, whose name appeared on the charge sheet as Frederick Allen, [aka Frederick Bornstein] was charged at the Water Police Court to-day with attempting to steal the sum of 5s-8d from the person of Maggie Whitton. There were only two witnesses for the prosecution, Plain-clothes Constable Thomas Malone and Miss Whitton. The accused, who pleaded not guilty, was defended by Mr RH. Levien.

    [Thomas] Malone’s evidence went to show that at about 3 pm on the 2nd instant he was at the Association Ground, and saw the accused come round the side of the ground and go behind Miss Whitton, who was standing with a girl smaller than herself. Malone was then three or four yards away. Just at the finish of a bicycle race the accused went up close to Miss Whitton, and placed his head over her left shoulder and his right hand into her pocket. The young lady then turned round, and put her hand to her pocket. She turned round to look at the racing again, when the accused put his hand to the top of her pocket, but as he did so Malone, who was by this time alongside of him, caught his hand. Malone took him round to the entrance gate, and leaving him there in charge of a constable, fetched Miss Whitton. Malone took him to No. 3 Police Station, where on charging him the accused replied, “I am a respectable storekeeper; you will be sorry for charging me with that.”

    Miss Whitton gave evidence that she felt a hand at the side of her pocket. She moved, and then felt it inside her pocket. She turned round, and put her hand down, which touched the hand of the accused, who was standing at the side, and slightly behind her. She then turned again, and looked at the race. She saw the accused arrested. She had 5s and other property in her pocket.

    In reply to Mr Levien Miss Whitton said she lost nothing.

    The accused [Frederick Allen] went into the box. He said that his name was not Allen, but Bornsttein. He denied placing his hand in the young lady’s pocket at all. He admitted having been convicted, but averred that for a little more than 12 months past he had been earning an honest living. He kept a tobacconist, stationery, and newsagent’s shop in Paddington, and was up at 6 o'clock in the morning delivering papers. He produced receipts in his business to show that he had been carrying on business as stated.

    He was sentenced to six months’ hard labour.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Evening News, Fri 6 Jan 1899 35

A HOLIDAY INCIDENT.
———◦———

    At the Water Police Court yesterday, Frederick Allen, or [Frederick] Bornstein, 33, was charged with attempting to steal a purse, containing about 5s, the property of Maggie Whitton.

    Constable Malone, stated that on January 2 he was in the shilling reserve at the Sydney Cricket Grounds where he saw accused go up behind the prosecutrix, and put his right hand into her pocket. The girl moved, and accused having stepped back again came forward, and put his hand on top of the pocket. Malone caught him by the hand, and arrested him.

    At No. 3 Station accused, who denied the charge, said “I’m a respectable storekeeper, and you will be sorry for charging me with this.”

    Maggie Whitton stated that on the day in question she felt a hand at her pocket. Subsequently she put her hand round, and struck accused’s hand.

    The accused, who pleaded not guilty, said that he had been “in trouble” before, but for the last twelve months he had been in business in Paddington as a tobacconist, newsagent, and stationer. He had no occasion to do what he was charged with. He complained that the detective police were hounding him down, and he had written to Judge Backhouse on the subject. Even that day he had been taken to the station for identification, when he had done nothing. His place of business was close to the Paddington Police Station, and the force there had nothing against him. He did not, however, accuse Malone of persecuting him.

    Mr Wilshire, SM, found the charge proved, and sentenced Bornstein to six months’ hard labor.

    Bornstein: Well, your Worship, I have got my living honestly for the past twelve months. I have been persecuted.

    Mr Wilshire, SM: Then you have relapsed into evil ways.

    Bornstein: But, your Worship—–

    Mr Wilshire, SM: I do not wish to hear any more.

    The prisoner was then removed from the court, muttering as he went.

 



Frederick Bornstein
, 1901

 

The Australian Star, Mon 23 Sep 1901 36

A STREET SUSPECT.
———◦———

    Frederick Bornstein was charged at the Central Police Court to-day with being a suspect in George-street, with intent to commit u felony. Senior-Constable Bennet was with Detective Keating [sic] in George-street on Saturday night, when he saw Bornstein walking on ahead. A woman carrying a baby was moving along the footpath through the crowd, and Bornstein pushed up against her unnecessarily hard, and when she turned he moved away, and devoted himself to contemplating the goods in Edward Hordern’s window. There was something on the ground, and Frederick picked it up and pocketed it. Next he passed on to Percy Hordern’s, and not being altogether satisfied with the quality of some of the umbrellas displayed tugged at one of them to test its fastenings. Then he went into Liverpool-street, and turned his back upon a boot shop to gaze the better upon the classic front of the Central Police Court. A pair of boots fell right into Frederick’s hands there, and he held them up behind him for fear they should fall down, and he sailed. Detective Keating hid his face with his umbrella (not Hordern’s, but his own gingham), and went after Bornstein, who made a hasty reference to the Almighty, and requested the officers not to “bump” him or “lumber” him. He averred this morning that he was merely looking for someone to give him work, but the court didn’t believe him, as his career savoured more of the ins than the outs of life, and sent him up for three months.

 



Frederick Bornstein
, 1902

 

The Australian Star, Sat 21 Jun 1902 37

A CHANCE FOR PRISONERS’
AID SOCIETY.
———◦———

Biloela (Cockatoo Island), 1889. Image: NSW State Library collection. Reproduction: Peter de Waal
Biloela (Cockatoo Island), 1889. Image: NSW
State Library collection. Reproduction: Peter de Waal

    Frederick Bornstein was captured by Constable Smudge running off with a pair of boots on Thursday. Bornstein pleaded guilty at the Central yesterday, and blamed the gaol authorities for it all, “When a man,” he pleaded, “like me come out of gaol before daylight, what is he to do? I come out yesterday morning, whilst the stars were shining, after doing four months at yer Worship’s hands, and where was I to go? Why, to a pub. And when a man like me goes to a pub and takes his grog, of course at that early hour it takes effect, and then he goes and pinches a pair of boots.”

    Three months at Parramatta.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Evening News, Sat 21 Jun 1902 38

BRIEF RELEASE.
————

    While Constable Surridge was on duty in the vicinity of Goulburn-street on Thursday, he saw a man named Frederick Bornstein, 27, labourer, under whose coat a boot was hanging. He arrested the man, who begged to be let off, as he had only come out of gaol that morning. It was discovered that the boot and its mate had been stolen from Enoch Taylor and Company, so Bornstein was charged with stealing them at the Central Court yesterday. He pleaded guilty, and said that after leaving Biloela he went into a hotel and had a few drinks. He had money, and could not understand what caused him to take the boots. Bornstein, who had a record, was sentenced to three months’ gaol.

 



Frederick Bornstein and James McMahon
, 1903  39

 

The Sydney Morning Herald, Fri 30 Jan 1903 40

QUARTER SESSIONS.
(Before Judge Rogers and a Jury of 12.)
(Mr Herbert Harris, Crown Prosecutor.) 

PLEAS OF GUILTY.

Facade of F Lasseter, George Street, 1920-1930. Image: NSW State Library collection. Reproduction: Peter de Waal
Facade of F Lasseter, George Street, 1920-1930.
Image: NSW State Library collection.
Reproduction: Peter de Waal

    The following persons pleaded guilty and were remanded for sentence:—

    Frederick Bornstein and James McMahon, charged with stealing a hat, the property of F Lasseter and Co, Limited, at Sydney, on December 16 last.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Evening News, Tue 3 Feb 1903 41

“THE NECESSARIES
OF LIFE.”
————

    Frederick Bornstein and James McMahon pleaded guilty at the Darlinghurst Sessions yesterday to having stolen a hat from a cart standing in George-street. When asked if they had anything to say, they declared that they had been driven to do what they had done from necessity.

    Judge Rogers remarked he could hardly believe that any man in this country would be driven to steal in order to secure the necessaries of life. “Most people will give a man something to eat at all events, and here you go and steal from a cart a hat or something of the sort,” added his Honour.

    The recorder having read a long list of previous convictions against them, they were sentenced each to 12 months.

 



Frederick Wiseman
, 1915  42

 

Leader, Fri 8 Jan 1915 43

ORANGE POLICE COURT.
———◦———
VAGRANCY CHARGES.
————

    Thomas Smith, 28, was presented before Mr Marriott, PM, yesterday morning, on a charge of vagrancy.

    Constable Walsh said the defendant had been in Orange for two months, and he had known him to do no work. He had seen Smith practically every day hanging about the hotels and the street corners, often under the influence of liquor. On December 15 a man named Driscoll was locked up for being drunk. He had 8/- in his possession. which was all that was left of £11. Smith had been following him about. Certain allegations had been made against defendant, who admitted when arrested, that he had only done one day’s work since coming to Orange. A hamper which was stolen from the Oriental Hotel was found 50 yards from where Smith was camped. He told witness that he lived on one meal a day.

    Constable Morris, lock-up keeper, said Smith had a halfpenny when locked up.

    Defendant denied having met Driscoll, and said he had no fixed place of abode. Since first coming to Orange, seven or eight weeks ago, he went to Tullamore for a week. Previous to that he worked on tho Werris Creek line. It was correct that he had only done a day’s work here, but he had never been in any trouble before.

    To Inspector Bear: He never had been cautioned by the police. On the 31st December he was at Cooper’s Hotel all day, and saw a hamper in the corner of the bar. That night he camped at the saleyards with Fred Wiseman, [aka Frederick Bornstein] in whose company he was at the hotel. He saw a hamper near his camp on New Year’s morning, and subsequently saw it at the police station.

    To the PM—He was a native of Tasmania, and left there when nine years of age.

    The PM said poverty, was no crime, but it was a suspicious thing when a man hung about the hotels, following men about. Appearances were very much against Smith, and he had not given a satisfactory account of his doings. He would be sent to Bathurst gaol for one month.

    Frederick Wiseman, 50. was next presented on a similar charge.

    Constable Walsh stated that this defendant had been in Orange for three weeks, and apparently had done no work. His practice was to hang about the hotels and Robertson Park. When taken to the police station he said he worked for a farmer at Cargo for four weeks before coming here. On the day when Driscoll was locked up witness had occasion to warn Wiseman, because of complaints received.

    To defendant—I will swear you were in Orange 17 days before being arrested. There were not 10 or 12 men camped at the saleyards when I went there and saw you and Smith.

    Constable Morris gave evidence in support of the charge. Wiseman had sixpence on him when arrested, and a Saving’s Bank book, showing a credit balance of 2/-. He was arrested for being drunk on Christmas Eve, and when discharged on the following day he was warned to get into work.

    To defendant—You told me that you were waiting for the sewerage works to start.

    Defendant said he had been harvesting for Phillip O’Connor at Cargo, and the police should have called him.

    Inspector Bear read out a list of 26 previous convictions for being a suspected person, stealing, having house breaking implements in his possession, vagrancy, assault, and various other offences. He had gone under several aliases, and served various sentences up to five years.

    The PM said defendant was a dangerous man to be at large.

    Wiseman asserted that he had been at work for the past 10 months. He came to Orange with £10, but unfortunately took to drink.

    The PM—You will go to Bathurst gaol for six months.

    Wiseman—Well, look. You give me six months now; I’ll never work any more. I am satisfied the police don’t want a man to work.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Bathurst Times, Wed 13 Jan 1915 44

THE BULL’S EYE
AND SOME OUTERS


    Frederick Wiseman was, at the Orange police court, sentenced to six months’ hard labor in Bathurst Gaol.

    Frederick Wiseman was an unwise man to fall in like that.

 


1     The Sydney Morning Herald, (NSW), Wed 11 Aug 1880, p. 7. Emphasis added.

2     The Sydney Morning Herald, (NSW), Sat 24 Sep 1881, p. 7. Emphasis added.

3     The Sydney Morning Herald, (NSW), Wed 16 Aug 1882, p. 3. Emphasis added.

4     Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Tue 13 Feb 1883, p. 2. Emphasis added.

5     Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Fri 30 Jan 1885, p. 5. Emphasis added.

6     Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Mon 9 Feb 1885, p. 4.

7     The Sydney Morning Herald, (NSW), Sat 29 Aug 1885, p. 11.

8     Globe, (Sydney, NSW) Thu 20 May 1886, p. 5. Emphasis added.

9     A gaol photograph for Frederick Bornstein is available from:—SRNSW: NRS2138, [3/6048], Darlinghurst Gaol photographic description book, 1886-1887, No. 3894, p. 135, R5102.

10   A gaol photograph for Samuel Knapp is available from:—SRNSW: NRS2138, [3/6048], Darlinghurst Gaol photographic description book, 1886-1887, No. 3891, p. 132, R5102.

11   The Sydney Morning Herald, (NSW), Fri 13 May 1887, p. 4.

12   The Sydney Morning Herald, (NSW), Sat 28 May 1887, p. 8. Emphasis added.

13   The Sydney Morning Herald, (NSW), Tue 31 May 1887, p. 4.

14   Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Wed 9 Jul 1890, p. 5. Emphasis added.

15   The Australian Star, (Sydney, NSW), Fri 11 Jul 1890, p. 5. Emphasis added.

16   The Australian Star, (Sydney, NSW), Mon 13 Oct 1890, p. 5.

17   Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Tue 14 Oct 1890, p. 3.

18   Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Sat 14 Feb 1891 p. 8.

19   The Australian Star, (Sydney, NSW), Tue 24 Mar 1891, p. 6.

20   Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Wed 25 Mar 1891 p. 5.

21   The Australian Star, (Sydney, NSW), Thu 30 Jul 1891, p. 5.

22   Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Sat 1 Aug 1891 p. 6.

23   A gaol photograph for Frederick Bornstein is available from:—SRNSW: NRS2138, [3/6054], Darlinghurst Gaol photographic description book, 1891-1892, No.5339, p. 110, R5104.

24   Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Mon 4 Jan 1892 p. 5.

25   Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Mon 7 Mar 1892 p. 6. Emphasis added.

26   The Australian Star, (Sydney, NSW), Sat 12 Mar 1892, p. 2. Emphasis added.

27   Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Sat 12 Mar 1892 p. 2. Emphasis added.

28   National Advocate, (Bathurst, NSW), Mon 14 Mar 1892, p. 3. Emphasis added.

29   Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Tue 12 Apr 1892 p. 7. Emphasis added.

30   The Sydney Morning Herald, (NSW), Tue 12 Apr 1892, p. 3. Emphasis added.

31   The Australian Star, (Sydney, NSW), Wed 13 Apr 1892, p. 2. Emphasis added.

32   Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Wed 13 Apr 1892 p. 5.

33   A gaol photograph for Frederick Allen is available from:—SRNSW: NRS2138, [3/6064], Darlinghurst Gaol photographic description book, 1899-1900, No. 7689, pp. 1, 2, R5108. And—SRNSW: NRS1998, [3/13073], Bathurst Gaol photographic description book, 1874-1930, No. 7689, p. 115, R5090..

34   The Australian Star, (Sydney, NSW), Fri 6 Jan 1899, p. 7. Emphasis added.

35   Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Fri 6 Jan 1899 p. 3. Emphasis added.

36   The Australian Star, (Sydney, NSW), Mon 23 Sep 1901, p. 6.

37   The Australian Star, (Sydney, NSW), Sat 21 Jun 1902, p. 7.

38   Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Sat 21 Jun 1902 p. 6.

39   A gaol photograph for Frederick Bornstein is available from:—SRNSW: NRS2138, [3/6068], Darlinghurst Gaol photographic description book, 1902-1903, No. 8872, pp.83-84, R5110. And—SRNSW: NRS1998, [3/13074], Bathurst Gaol photographic description book, 1874-1930, No. –, p. 148, R5090.

40   The Sydney Morning Herald, (NSW), Fri 30 Jan 1903 p. 3.

41   Evening News, (Sydney, NSW), Tue 3 Feb 1903 p. 5.

42   A gaol photograph for Frederick Allen (aka Frederick Bornstein) is available from:—SRNSW: NRS1998, [3/5964], Bathurst Gaol photographic description book, 1874-1930, No. 2117, p. 208, R5087. And—SRNSW: NRS1998, [3/13078], Bathurst Photograph description books, 1 Jan 1914-31 Dec 1917, No. 2117, p. 34, R5091.

43   Leader, (Orange, NSW) Fri 8 Jan 1915, p. 4. Emphasis added.

44   The Bathurst Times, (NSW), Wed 13 Jan 1915, p. 2.