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1867, Alexander Boddie - Unfit For Publication
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    Boddie came from Scotland in 1864 1 to Sydney as a Free Church minister.

    Probably born in Scotland, but nothing confirmed. May be identical with and Alexander Boddie, son of John Boddie, millwright, who attended Marischal College, Aberdeen, from 1849-1853, but who did not take a degree.

    Unknown regarding places/dates of birth and death — no record in Probate index, so possible did not die in NSW, but note he may have been deposed for intemperance — may not have left an estate.

    He served on the NSW south coast in Eden and Bega 1864/1867, and a few months supply (acting minister) Chalmers Street, Sydney, from Feb/Sep 1864.

    Appointed by Free Church Colonial Committee in Scotland in 1860 as a soldiers' missionary and served as assistant to a Rev G Wiseby on Malta where he apparently served faithfully; Same Committee appointed him to NSW in 1863.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Tue 26 Jan 1864 2 

Wesleyan Centenary Chapel, opened 14 Feb 1844, with York Street (between King and Market streets) frontage, at bottom right. Image: Australian Town and Country Journal,Sat11May1889,p.31.Reproduc- tion: Peter de Waal
Wesleyan Centenary Chapel, opened 14 Feb 1844, with York Street
(between King and Market streets) frontage, at bottom right.
Image: Australian Town and Country Journal,Sat11May1889,p.31.
Reproduc- tion: Peter de Waal

    WELCOME TO WESLEYAN MINISTERS.—A tea and public meeting took place last night; the former in the schoolrooms beneath the Wesleyan Centenary Chapel, York-street, and the latter in the church itself. The body of the church was well filled. After tea, the Rev R Amos offered up prayer. The Rev J Watkin was requested to preside. The chairman, in some appropriate remarks, avowed that he was a Methodist, glanced at the history of Wesleyan Methodism in the colony, and briefly explained that the meeting had been convened to welcome Wesleyan ministers [Rev Messrs: Bourne, Brenwell, Manning, Sellers and Boddie] who arrived at Sydney by the Damascus about a fortnight ago. Mr E Vickery recounted the preliminary steps which had been taken prior to the introduction of the new ministers, and read certain resolutions which had been agreed to by the committee of the Wesleyan Church Extension and Sustentation Society in reference to the bringing out from England of additional ministers. The committee had met with great disparagements, but all obstacles had been overcome. This last accession to their ministerial strength was most opportune, and he was happy in knowing the rev gentlemen themselves were men of the right stamp. The speaker read the names of the subscribers to a fund of over £600 which had been speedily collected for the special purpose of giving effect to the resolutions. They had great reason for gratitude to the Divine Being for the safe arrival of their brethren—The Chairman remarked that in addition to the eight ministers lately obtained from England, two more were expected shortly to arrive; and of fifteen candidates (young men raised in the colonies) who had offered themselves to the Conference now sitting, fourteen had been accepted.—The Rev S Ironside begged with all his heart to welcome his young brethren on the platform, and he was persuaded that they would be a great blessing to New South Wales. He spoke of the physical capabilities of the colony—of its great material progress—and he enlarged more fully on the efforts were being made by different demonstrations to further the cause of Christianity in the colony. The new ministers would meet with some difficulties, but a career of usefulness and success awaited them.—Mr J Dawson bade the new ministers a hearty and earnest welcome, and wished them God speed. He wished them, wherever they might go, health, peace, and spiritual prosperity—The Chairman then shook each of the new ministers by the hand, and, after a part of a hymn had been sung, called on the Rev R Sellors to address the meeting.—He thanked them for the kind welcome which had been give n to them, and he rejoiced to recognise the position which the Church occupied in the colony, and the cheerful disposition of the people to hear the Word of God. They came out to Australia with the sanction and approval of the English Conference, and had come to preach that Gospel which men already felt to be the power of God to their salvation. He was glad to see the advance which the Church had made in New South Wales, and he looked upon the good that had been accomplished as but the foretaste of still greater blessings. The Rev WE Bourne dwelt upon the unison of sentiment and cordial goodwill which existed amongst the members of the Wesleyan Methodist Church throughout the world, as having been one of his first impressions on arriving in Sydney. He narrated some of the circumstances of his earlier life, spoke of the responsibilities of the Christian ministry, and expressed his determination to devote himself unreservedly to the cause of God. He thanked them for the kind reception with which they had been greeted; and he trusted their present welcome would be followed by their lasting esteem. The Rev C Stead referred to the pain which he had felt in leaving the mother country, though he informed the meeting that he now felt quite at home in the new land. His supreme anxiety was to be usefully employed for the Church, he had not come to gather gold, nor did he seek the applause of the world; but he wished bring souls to the cross of Christ, so that he might obtain that honour which came from above, and which infinitely surpassed in worth the approval of men. The Rev JN Manning felt grateful for the kindness which had been bestowed on him, and was impressed with a solemn feeling of his own weakness, and the necessity of a rededication of himself to the service of God. It was the highest ambition of his life to become a faithful and diligent Australian Wesleyan minister. The Rev FT Brentnall recounted some of his former associations, and incidentally remarked on a variety of topics appropriate to the occasion. Among other things he dwelt on the position of Wesleyan Methodism in England, America, and other parts of the globe, and he stated that at the close of the Conference sitting in Melbourne the ministers of that church in Australia would number two hundred and fifty. Though the new ministers had lost none of their affection for England and the associations of home, their motto now was “Advance Australia,” and they desired above all things that it might advance in Christianity—in Methodism. After a few observations from the Rev Mr Chapman and Mr J Caldwell, MLA, the meeting was closed at ten o’clock with singing and prayer.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Rev Alexander C Boddie comes to Bega, 1864 3

65

Fresh Workers

In 1864
...
    The Rev AC Boddie, a licentiate of the Free Church of Scotland, was received by the Church Extension Committee and ordained as a missionary to labour in the southern parts of the colony.

291

Presbytery of Monaro.
Bega

    Bega formed part of the original Twofold Bay parish, which extended from Cobargo on the north to the Victorian border on the south. In this extensive field the first minister settled was the Rev Colin R Greig, who remained till 1864, when he resigned. He was followed by the Rev Alexander Boddie, the charge meanwhile having been transferred from the Presbytery of Illawarra to that of Sydney, on account of the greater facilities for travelling. Mr Boddie’s pastorate extended to 1867.

295
Eden.

    Eden formed part of what was originally the Twofold Bay parish. This covered a large territory, including in addition to Eden, Bega, Pambula and other centres. The ministers whose names are associated with the charge in its undivided state are the Revs Colin R Greig, AC Boddie, William Thom, MA, and William Baker.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Foundation Stone of Eden Presbyterian Church 24 May 1865 4

Laying of the Foundation Stone of the Presbyterian Church at Eden

St George Uniting Church’s, notice board, Eden NSW. Photo: Peter de Waal
St George Uniting Church’s, notice board, Eden
NSW. Photo: Peter de Waal

Although the town of Eden has been inhabited for many years, it has hitherto been without a Protestant place of worship. This want is now about to be supplied by the erection of a Presbyterian Church. Since the settlement of the Rev A Boddie, as the Presbyterian minister in the district of Twofold Bay, the cause of Presbyterianism, which had been in a very unsatisfactory state, has made such progress that the people have resolved to erect two churches, one at Eden, and one at Bega. The foundation stone of the former was laid on the 24th of May, by Mrs Barclay, widow of the late George Barclay Esq JP, who was for many years a steady and liberal supporter of the cause in that part of the colony. As this was the first ceremony of the kind that had ever taken place in Eden, it excited much interest in the district, and a large number of people assembled to witness it. The Rev A Boddie conducted the devotional exercises, and gave an address on Presbyterianism. Joseph Teas Esq, then handed to Mrs Barclay a handsome silver trowel and mallet of blood wood, and that lady having performed her part in the interesting ceremony, the Rev J Parsons, of the Wesleyan Church, offered up an appropriate prayer. This part of the proceedings was brought to a close by the signing of the doxology, and the pronouncing of the benediction. In the afternoon upwards of two hundred people partook of tea, &c., which had been liberally provide by ladies belonging to all denominations. After tea brief addresses were delivered by the Revs A Boddie, and J Parsons, Dr Shiels, and J Walker Esq, CPS; at intervals, hymns were sung by the members of Mr Boddie’s Bible class and the children of the Sabbath school. The usual votes of thanks having been given, the company separated, and all present appeared highly gratified that the day’s proceedings had passed off so satisfactorily. The proceeds of the tea meeting, upwards of £20, go to the building fund. The church will be a neat gothic structure of brick on a stone foundation, 40 feet by 20, with porch, 8 by 7, and is estimated to cost about £350. Upwards of £300 have been subscribed already, and it is therefore expected that the church will be opened free of debt. Not the least gratifying circumstance connected with the raising of the funds, is the fact that the whole of the subscriptions have been obtained without any personal effort on the part fo the minister of the congregation. It is intended that the church shall be connected with the general assembly of the Presbyterian Church of New South Wales, and when finished it will be the first church built in connexion with that body perhaps this consideration may induce some wealthy Presbyterian to present the congregation with a bell for the new edifice. The site is the gift of Mrs Barclay, and is one of the finest in Eden.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Bega Gazette and County of Auckland Advertiser, Sat 27 May 1865 5

SATURDAY MAY 27.
[LAYING OF THE FOU]NDATION STONE
[...] PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH.

...
George Moorley. William Ogle, contractor.

    About two o’clock a large number of persons assembled which we noticed some of the leading and most influential residents of the district, and formed a circle around the stone to witness the ceremony, when the Rev A Boodie [sic] briefly addressed the assemblage in a very impressive manner, and stated that Presbyterianism was the largest protestant denomination in the world: although it does not occupy that position among the churches in New South Wales.

    Mr Teas then came forward and presented Mrs Barclay with a mallet and silver trowel, who then laid the foundation stone in the usual manner.

The following was beautifully inscribed on a silver plate on the box which contained the mallet and trowel.

Presented to
MRS GEORGE BARCLAY,
On the occasion of laying the Foundation Stone of the
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, BEGA.
May 24th, 1855 [sic

————————— 

THE TEA MEETING:

    At four o’clock about two hundred persons sat down to tea in a large room prepared for the purpose, which was magnificently arranged for the occasion; there was a large sprinkling of fair sex present, whose presence added considerably to the splendour of the room, which was tastefully decorated with flags. As soon as the visitors were seated the young people of the Bible Class and Sunday School sang two or three hymns with enthusiasm and it was really a credit to their pastor (the Rev A Boodie) and a pleasure to their parents and guardians to listen to them blend their voices in hymns of praise. The tables were crowded with abundance of eatables in the way of refreshments, which every one present seemed to do ample justice to. 

St George Uniting Church, (formerly St George’s Pres- byterian church), Eden NSW. Photo: Peter de Waal
St George Uniting Church, (formerly St George’s Pres-
byterian church), Eden NSW. Photo: Peter de Waal

When tea was over Mr Walker proposed that Mr Boodie do take the chair.

The Rev A Parsons then came forward and gave an eloquent and able address. He said that he was happy to be present on this occasion, to witness the ceremony which had that day been performed, and hoped that it would be the means of spreading the gospel with greater success than it has hitherto been; he alluded to the state of the colony, which he attributed to the want of churches where the gospel might be preached, how heart-rendering it must be to the people of Great Britain to read month after month, of the horrible depredations carried on in the interior of Australia, but he hoped ere long the Church of Christ would succeed in putting it down, and hold still more prominent position in those disturbed districts of the colony, and that the ministers engaged in them should be crowned with success in their endeavors [sic]. It was gratifying to him to see the people of the district of Eden so unanimous in their endeavors to erect the church, of which the foundation stone had been laid. After briefly alluding to the enjoyments of the day, he resumed his seat amidst great applause ...

The Rev A Boodie in a ...
and encouraging address ...
on their minds the ...
moral ...

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Empire, Wed 20 Sep 1865 6

ROPE’S CREEK.
——————
(From Our Correspondent.)

    On Wednesday, the 13th instant, a tea and public meeting, in connection with the Presbyterian Church, was held at Chatsworth, the property of David Shepherd, Esq. Mr and Mrs Shepherd spared no expense in carrying out, on a liberal scale, the arrangements to celebrate this our first meeting of this kind in the district since the consummation of the Union.

    At an early hour in the forenoon large numbers were observed wending their way to the place of meeting, some on foot, others on horseback, and in gigs and jaunting care down to the humble cart which was used by many as a mode of transit. The festal scene, as it suddenly burst upon our view, presented a very pleasing and picturesque appearance. The people seemed to be giving themselves up to the hilarity of the hour. The more youthful were disporting on the greensward, others were amusing themselves at the game of cricket, others again preferred kiss in the ring, which appeared to be a very attractive source of amusement with many of our lads and lasses; while the more sedate were assembled in detached groups, giving expression to these mutual interchanges of friendly intercourse which add much to the enjoyment of such festal gatherings. Mr and Mrs Shepherd were to be seen buying themselves in forwarding the necessary arrangements. Two large tables, under the colossal tent, were loaded with a profusion of everything that could tempt the palate, provided at the sole expense of our worthy friends at Chatsworth.

    After tea seats were placed in a circle outside. Everyone appeared to be well pleased with the entertainment, and with Mr and Mrs Shepherd’s kind and urbane demeanour.

    Mr James Young, of St Mary’s, South Creek, was nominated to the chair. As the time was limited, he forthwith called upon the Rev Alexander Boddie of Twofold Bay, to give out the 100th Psalm, which was sung with much fervour, under the “greenwood tree.” The reverend gentleman, after prayer, dispensed the rite of baptism to two children, and, at its conclusion, gave us an excellent address on the duties generally of parenting to their children. The Rev Mr Johnstone, of Braidwood, who spoke next, referred, among other matters, to these discouragements with which ministers have to contend in many of our country districts, in consequence of the irregular attendance of the people at the ordinances of the church. He was followed by the Rev George Woolnough, the Wesleyan minister of Penrith, who adverted, in a very interesting manner, to the introduction of religious ordinances into the distant interior, and in connection with this, spoke with much approbation of the union recently consummated. The Rev Mr Donald, of Newtown, next addressed the meeting on the responsibilities of parents, and called our attention to the trashy and pernicious books which, at the present time, were issued in great numbers from the press. He dwelt upon their injurious tendency, and deprecated their perusal by young people. He interspersed his observations with a few interesting illustrations, and concluded with a humorous anecdote representing the enthusiasm of a Scotch immigrant for his national emblem, the thistle, by introducing it into the colony of Tasmania, which, in a few years, was dispersed broadcast, to the dismay and consternation of farmers. The Chairman at this stage of the proceedings (according to previous arrangements) gave an address on the subject of the union, and dwelt upon the brotherly love and forbearance which should animate the members of our church to each other. Mr Roger McKinnon, Presbyterian Catechist at St Mary’s pourtrayed [sic] the many advantages emanating from a regular attendance on the means of grace and gave some animating descriptions of the blessings of the Gospel. He was followed by one of the company making a few pertinent remarks on the advantages of Sabbath-schools.

    The cordial thanks of the meeting were given, by acclamation, to Mr and Mrs Shepherd, for their liberality on this occasion. Thanks were also given to the visitors, and to Mr McKinnon and also to Mr Young, for his conduct in the chair. A doxology having been sung, and the benediction pronounced, the meeting dispersed shortly after four o’clock.

    Thus terminated a very agreeable meeting, which will long be remembered and associated with many pleasing reminiscences.

    I must not omit to refer to the favourite duet “Ye banks and braes” which was sung with much effect, and elicited the hearty approbation of the meeting.

    In conclusion, I may mention that Mr and Mrs Shepherd recently established a preaching station at Chatsworth in connection with our Presbyterian Church. The manifestations they have given of their interest in the progress of our common Presbyterianism deserve our warmest acknowledgements. There is some prospect that a new building, to accommodate the increasing congregation at this place, will ere long be erected. Mr Shepherd, with his usual liberality, has kindly promised us a site for the purpose.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Bega Gazette and Eden District or Southern Coast Advertiser, Sat 2 Jun 1866 7

EDEN, TWOFOLD BAY.
(FROM OUR CORRESPONDENCE.)
OPENING OF THE NEW PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH.

    On Thursday last the great event which has been looked forward to with so much interest, and which has been casting its shadow far and wide, appeared and fully realised all the anticipated pleasure and interest.

    I of course allude to the opening of the Presbyterian church here, which time has I believe been anxiously awaited by many.

The labours of the day began at noon by service, at which the Rev Dr Lang officiated, in fulfilment of a promise made some time since the Rev Mr Boddie. The little church was comfortably crowded, even the aisle being occupied by cross seats. It is estimated that over 200 people gathered on the occasion. The service commenced with singing the 100th Psalm; afterwards the Rev Doctor engaged in prayer. The 1st chapter of 1st Corinthians was read and followed by singing the 25th Psalm. The doctor then drew attention to the 22nd, 23rd, 24th verses of the chapter previously read, as those in which his text was to be found; and began by describing the position and commercial importance of the city of Corinth in the days of Paul; then pictured the great apostle trudging wearily on the road thither; his first appearance in the city – his rude speech when contrasted with that of the majority of the Greeks, whose entire time was engaged in the search after wisdom, and whose schools of philosophy were so numerous and so constantly attended – depicting the astonishment and ridicule with which the apostle was received when he first gave utterance to the doctrines of Christ crucified, and first called on them to believe in Jesus; shewing that this doctrine as it had proved to the Jews a stumbling block, even so it fell upon the philosophical ear of the Greeks as foolishness. He then depicted the gradual dawning of light upon the minds of the Greeks – the working of the Holy Spirit in men’s hearts – the belief of first one and then another in the words of the great preacher, who still appealed to them in spite of all ridicule and persecution in the name of Him with whom alone salvation was to be found; and then wound up by imagining the earnest cry of those whose hearts had been ben pricked, “What shall we do to be saved.” and their almost despairing appeal to Paul to direct them in their trouble, and by calling on the congregation to seek that same Jesus, who had proved to the Jews a stumbling block – to the Greeks foolishness – but to them who believed the word of God unto salvation, and whose word would always be preached in that church.

Singing and prayer followed – the daughter of B Russell, Esq., was baptised, and a collection made amounting to £13. The doxology was joint in by all, and the Rev Doctor, after pronouncing the blessing, bade all prepare for the tea meeting, to take place at 5 pm.

[Text missing here] been installed amidst great cheering, laid a brief statement bore the meeting of the financial state of the church, showing that the subscriptions received, added to the collections and anticipated proceeds of this meeting, would nearly, if not quite, enable him, as Treasurer, to state that they entered the building that day free of debt. He trusted that in a very short time the church would be provided with suitable pews. And after congratulating them on having such a neat and commodious place of worship presented to them under such favourable circumstances; and calling on the Rev Mr Boddie to address them, he resumed his seat amidst great applause.

The Rev Mr Boddie rose, and would again congratulate his friends on the really very satisfactory circumstances in which they were that day enabled to open their church; and he trusted that Almighty God would so bless the preaching of the world in that house, that many might be brought to a knowledge of the true God – of the means of salvation through a crucified Redeemer, and be let to forsake the world and its vanities, and cast themselves at the feet of Him, who has promised to cast none out that come. As Dr Lang and himself had to proceed that night to Pambula, he would not occupy them with a long speech; and would merely mention that they were indebted to al classes and denominations for great assistance in erecting the church. He had received a note from the Rev JL Knight, enclosing an excuse for his non-attendance, and sincerely congratulating them on the completion of the work. James Manning, Esq., had also written to excuse his absence, and, with similar congratulations, tendered two guineas towards the funds. He (Mr B) felt extremely grateful to all for their liberality, and the kind manner in which many had come such long distances to attend the opening ceremonies.

The cheering that followed having subsided, another hymn was sung, and then the Red Dr Lang rose, and was received with every demonstration pleasure. He must say that he hardly anticipated being present at such a highly respectable and well-attended meeting as he that evening witnessed, and he felt extremely grateful at the cordial reception they had given him. He considered that they had much to be proud of in the really neat little church that had that day, for the first time entered; and he trusted that under the preaching of his dear friend and brother, Mr Boddie, all who came to that house would be led to a knowledge of the Saviour Jesus Christ of Nazareth, whose blood cleanses from all sin. The Rev gentleman then began an explanation of the great political events of the past few years, shewing that they were most certainly connected with the prophecies of Holy Write. He then went on to say the present year and 1867 were to be, according to the statement of many who had studied the connection of the earth’s history with scripture, prophecies two of the most remarkable years since the creation, and that the overthrow of the Papal power would in all probability be one of the great events of the period. The second coming of Christ would, he believed, also take place during that time. He gave the several dates from which these various periods might be calculated; and called on all to watch and be prepared for the coming fo Christ in his glory.

The whole appeared to be a brief outline of Dr Cumming’s Destiny of Nations. On the Doctor resuming his seat the Rev Mr Boddie said, he had almost omitted what he really considered a duty, and would call on them, before leaving, to give a vote of thanks to Mr W White, for his assistance in providing a-plan for the church; to Mr Ogle, the contractor, who had certainly tried under very afflicting circumstances to satisfy them all; and to Mr Alexander Davidson, who had furnished, at his own cost, such an elegant and suitable pulpit for the building.

The two reverend gentlemen then rose to leave, but were stopped by Mr Wm Prescott, who begged, before they departed, to propose a vote of thanks to Rev Dr Lang for his great kindness in coming such a long and, as it proved, perilous journey, to open their church. He said perilous, as he had been an eye-witness on one occasion in which the Rev Doctor had been thrown from the buggy in which Dr Shields was driving him to Eden. As the MD fell upon the DD the consequences were not very serious; but had the DD fallen on the MD he certainly would not have expected to have seen the latter alive again.

The vote of thanks was given with enthusiasm. And the Doctor in acknowledging mentioned an anecdote of Dr Young, which rose another laugh, under cover of which the Doctor escaped. 6

Mr W White then rose, and having thanked the meeting for the kind manner in which they had acknowledged his slight assistance in the erection of the church, read a welcome to all in rhyme which appears elsewhere in our columns.

Some difficulty then occurred as to who should rise to speak for the ladies, who had so liberally supplied the good things that had crowded the tables that evening, – Mrs Barclay, Mrs Teas, Mrs Anderson, Mrs Leslie, Mrs Bonffield, and Mrs Moorley. No single gentleman making his appearance, Mr JM Walker rose and said that he knew he was out of place, but he really did not like to see the meeting break up without paying the honor certainly due to the ladies, for the very creditable manner in which they had performed their part of the evening’s entertainment. He would not have risen, but felt so ashamed of his fellow-men that he would not remain silent under the circumstances.

The Chairman then left the chair, and Mr W White took it.

Mr Morton, of Melbourne, then rose and proposed a vote of thanks to the late Chairman. As a stranger he ought not to have risen perhaps, but he wished to congratulate them on the possession of such a nice church, and on the happy termination of a still happier day. Attending the church was he believed a christian’s duty, but he would remind them that unless the heart was towards God their worship was vain.

The thanks of the meeting was then given to the late Chairman with boisterous clapping.

The Doxology having been sang, the meeting dispersed at a late hour, apparently all well contented with the proceedings for the day.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Gippsland Times, Thu 10 Jan 1867 8

SALE POLICE COURT.
——————
TUESDAY.
(Before the Mayor, A Arbuckle, and A Macarthur, Esqs, JP’s.)

UNNATURAL OFFENCE.

    Alexander Boddie was placed in the dock charged with having attempted to commit an unnatural offence at Eden, New South Wales. The prisoner was undefended.

    Senior Constable Hopkinson deposed that he arrested the prisoner on the 3rd inst from the description contained in a telegram, and that after the arrest the prisoner admitted his name was the same as contained in the telegram.

    On the application of Sergeant Scanlon the prisoner was remanded for a week for the production of further evidence.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Gippsland Times, Thu 17 Jan 1867 9

SALE POLICE COURT.
——————
WEDNESDAY.
(Before the Mayor, Mr Guthridge, A Macarthur, and A Arbuckle, Esqs, JP’s.)

    UNNATURAL OFFICE.—Alexander Boddie, on remand, was charged as above, and further remanded for a week, the warrant not yet having arrived.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

SALE POLICE COURT.
——————
TUESDAY.
(Before N Guthridge, and A Arbuckle, Esqs, JP’s.)

...

WEDNESDAY.
(Before the Mayor, and A Arbuckle, Esqs. JP.)

UNNATURAL OFFENCE.

    Alexander Boddie was brought up charged as above and on the application of the Sargeant remanded to one o’clock, by which time it was stated the warrant would arrive.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Thu 7 Feb 1867 11

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF NEW SOUTH WALES.
——————

THE Presbytery of Sydney met on Tuesday morning last, in St Stephen’s Church, and was constituted with prayer. Sederunt—The Rev C Atchison, moderator; and the Revs Dr Lang, J Milne, A Thomson, Dr Fullerton, TA Gordon, Dr Steel, J Dougall, J McGibbon, SF McKenzie, RS Paterson, Dr Beg, ministers; and J McNab, R Anderson, W King, elders.
...
    It having come to the knowledge of the Presbytery that the Rev Alexander Boddie, of Eden, Twofold Bay, has been apprehended by the civil authorities, and is now in custody on a criminal charge of a most serious nature, the Presbytery resolve, pending the investigation before the civil court, to suspend him from the office of the holy ministry and the communion of the Church, which resolution was unanimously agreed to. Whereupon the Presbytery, with sorrow and humiliation, approached the throne of Grace, their devotions being led by the Rev Dr Fullerton.

    A letter was read by the clerk addressed to the Moderator of the Presbytery, from Mr Joseph Tesa of Eden, stating that the Rev Mr Boddie had left the district, and that he believed that he had no intention of returning. The Presbytery appointed the Rev J McGibbon to go to Eden on the first opportunity and supply sermons in the districts for two Sabbaths.

    Letters were also read from Eden regarding supply and the use of the church, which were handed over to the deputy appointed to visit the district, and to deal with them according to his discretion.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser, Sat 9 Feb 1867 12

LOCAL NEWS.
———

...
    PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF NEW SOUTH WALES.—At a meeting of the Ppresbytery of Sydney, held at St Stephen’s Church on Tuesday last, the Rev W Purves, of East Maitland, was proposed as a corresponding member, which was agreed to. The Rev Alexander Boddie, of Eden, Twofold Bay, being now in custody, on a criminal charge of a serious nature, was suspended from the office of the holy ministry, pending the investiagtion of the charges brought against him.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Fri 15 Feb 1867 13

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.
THURSDAY.
FIRST COURT.

BEFORE his Honor Mr Justice CHEEKE.
...

UNNATURAL ASSAULT.

    Alexander Boddie was indicted for having, on the 2nd January, 1866, assaulted one john Alexander, with intent to commit a capital crime.

The prisoner, who was very much dejected, and kept his face buried in his hands during the whole of the trial, pleaded not guilty, and was defended by Mr Dalley, instructed by Mr Manby, of Twofold Bay. The Solicitor-General prosecuted.

The details of this case are wholly unfit for publication. The charge rested entirely upon the evidence of the prosecutor, John Alexander, who swore that the assault complained of had been committed on the date named, by the prisoner, who, it appeared, was a Presbyterian minister,, and visited his house in the exercise of his sacred vocation. Alexander was subjected to rigid cross-examination by the prisoner’s counsel, who elicited that the man had not spoken of the assault for some nine months after it occurred, that since the assault was committed he had allowed prisoner to perform the rites of burial over his (Alexander’s) deceased child; that he (Alexander) had been accused by a Mr Weatherhead, a friend of the prisoner’s, of having stolen a beast of his, and that he was very angry with prisoner for having told Weatherhead to prosecute him (Alexander); and that he had been once tried and acquitted on a charge of cattle-stealing. The prosecutor described the assault, and said that he had been afraid to speak of it because he thought that he should not be believed, and the Church to which the prisoner belonged would prosecute him. He was at last induced to disclose the affair hearing that the prisoner had assaulted his (Alexander’s) brother in a similar way. The occurrences took place at Perricol, Twofold Bay, the prosecutor being a free selector residing in that district.

Mr Dalley made an eloquent address to the jury in the prisoner’s defence, the Solicitor-General replied. His Honor briefly summed up, the jury retired, and after an absence of an hour found the prisoner “Not guilty.”

The prisoner was discharged.

The Court then, at a quarter-past 4 o’clock pm, adjourned until 10 o’clock this morning.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Sat 16 Feb 1867 14

CENTRAL POLICE COURT.
FRIDAY.

BEFORE their Worships the Police Magistrate, Messrs G Hill, Thornton, and Dangar.

    Of eleven prisoners brought before the Court, two were discharged and one (Alexander Boddie, charged with having attempted to commit an unnatural offence) was remanded to Pambula.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Gippsland Times, Sat 23 Feb 1867 15

    The Rev Mr Boddie, who, it will be recollected was arrested at Sale, and forwarded to New South Wales on the charge of having committed an indecent assault, has been tried in Sydney and acquitted. We copy the following account of the trial from the Sydney Herald of the 14th inst:—“At the central criminal court, on the 14th inst, Alexander Boddie was indicted for having, on the 2nd January, 1866, assaulted one John Alexander, with intent to commit a capital crime. The prisoner, who was very much dejected, and kept his face in his hands during the whole of the trial, pleaded not guilty, and was defended by Mr Dalley instructed by Mr Manby, of Twofold Bay. The Solicitor-General prosecuted. The details of this case are wholly unfit for publication. The charge rested entirely upon the evidence of the prosecutor, John Alexander, who swore that the assault complainted of had been committed on the date named, by the prisoner, who it appeared, was a Presbyterian minister, and visited his house in the exercise of his sacred vocation. Alexander was subjected to a rigid cross-examination by the prisoner’s counsel, who elicited that the man had not spoken of the assault for some nine months after it occurred; that since the assault was committed he had allowed prisoner to perform the rites of burial over his (Alexander’s) deceased child; that he (Alexander) had been accused by a Mr Weatherhead, a friend of the prisoner’s, of having stolen a beast of his, and that he was very angry with prisoner for having told Weatherhead to prosecute him (Alexander); and that he had been once tried and acquitted on the charge of cattle stealing. The prosecutor described the assault, and said that he had been afraid to speak of it because he thought that he should not be believed, and that the church to which he belonged would persecute him. He was at last induced to disclose the affair by hearing that the prisoner had assaulted his (Alexander’s) brother in a similar way. The occurrence took place at Perricol, Twofold Bay, the prosecutor being a free selector residing in the district. Mr Dalley made an eleoquent address to the jury in the prisoner’s defence; the Solicitor-General replied. His Honor briefly summed up, the jury retired, and after an absence of an hour found the prisoner” “Not guilty.” The prisoner was discharged. He has since been arrested on a second charge of the same nature.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Alexander Boddie no longer minister 16

Minister's Roll

    51– BODDIE, Alexander, 1864 (1864), Free, Twofold Bay 1865-6; declared no longer a Minister of the Ministers’ Roll Church 1867.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Depositions for Alexander Boddie 13 Mar 1867 Sydney trial 17 18

Information - (General Purposes.)

Eden, New South Wales, 
TO WIT.                       }
    Be it remembered, that on this twenty fifth day of February, in the year of Our Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and Sixty Seven, at Eden in the Colony of New South Wales, Thomas Compton Chandler, Sergeant of Police at Eden, appears before me, the undersigned, one of Her Majesty’s Justices duly assigned to keep the peace of our Lady the Queen in and for the Colony of New South Wales, and on oath informs me, that on or about the month of January October, in the year of Our Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and Sixty Five from information received he has reason to believe that Alexander Boddie Presbyterian Minister did attempt to commit a felony on one John Hopkins of Eden, Mail Contractor contrary to the Act in such case made and provided; whereon upon the said Thomas Compton Chandler prays that I, the said Justice will proceed in the premises according to law.
[Signed] TC Chandler. Sworn at Eden, in the said Colony, on the day first above written, before me.
[Signed] George Plunkett Keon, Justice of the Peace. [PM, Eden].

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

At a special Court of Petty Sessions holden at Pambula this Monday March the 4th 1866 [sic–1867] before CH Baddely Esquire, Alexander Boddie. Attempt to commit sodomy, Thomas Compton Chandler states: I’m Sergeant of Police stationed at Eden. I apprehended the Defendant now outside the Court by virtue of a warrant and I pray a sentence till tomorrow for evidence of John Hopkins.
[Signed] TC Chandler.

Sworn before me at the Police Court Pambula March 4th 1867.
[Signed] CH Baddely, JP.

    Bail allowed verbal recognizance self in two hundred pounds – William McNiven in one hundred pounds and James Kelly in one hundred pounds. [Signed] CH Baddely, JP.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

(M. 11 & 12 Vic., Cap. 42.)
Depositions of Witnesses.

TO WIT.     } 
The examination of John Hopkins of Eden in the Colony of New South Wales, taken on oath this 5th day of March in the year of Our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty seven at Pambula in the Colony aforesaid before the undersigned, one of Her Majesty’s Justices of the Peace for the said Colony in the presence and hearing of Alexander Boddie who is charged this day before me for that he the said Alexander Boddie on or about the month of October 1865 at Eden in the said Colony, did attempt to commit a felony on the body of one John Hopkins of Eden mail contractor.

1

    John Hopkins on oath states: I am a Mail Contractor I reside at Eden.

    In October 1865 Mr Boddie came to me at night said he had occasion to come out during the night and could not get back the same way he came out as he had closed the door against himself, he came into my bedroom and asked me if I would allow him to come and sleep with me. I said yes I had no objection as he closed himself out – the bed was a large double bed and plenty of room for us both. He came to bed with me

2

then for about 15 or 16 minutes we lay quite easy he began to fondle me then all over with his hands caught hold of me by the belly by the privates – tried to put his feet upon my side and throw his legs over me – he then tried to turn me over to him I lay on my belly he still had the same hold of me – I put him back with my arm and asked him was he mad – I told him to stop quiet so he did then for a time – he then put his hand on my neck through the pillow – he put his right arm over my breast and pulled me tight over to him – pulled me in to him –

3

he got one of his legs upon my belly crossing me right over my legs – I put him back and told him to stop that as I would not have any of it. So he did and he got up and went away – I did not see any more of him that night I daresay about a fortnight after again. He came to me again to my bedroom at night and said he could not get into the house he had occasion to come out that he had fastened himself out – he said he was very cold and (would ?) I allow him to come and sleep with me – I said it was very strange he should have come out and closed the door

4

against himself that he could not get back again the same way he came out – he had no clothes on but his trousers shirt and slippers – I said as he had no clothes I would allow him to come and sleep with me – not to 10  keep him out in the cold. He came into the bed then and shortly afterwards got hold of my hand and drew it down upon his privates – I pulled my hand away as soon as I felt where he had brought it to – I went then as far on the other side of the bed as possible – he came close up to me again – I was lying on my left side, he put his hand under my shirt and caught hold

5

of me by the belly again, I found his person (his privates) against my backside – I turned round to him and says “Are you mad? What do you want to do with me? – he did not answer – he said (umph) – like a grunt – he stopped quiet for a time – he then got hold of me, tried to have me turn over to him – but I would not I struck him back with my arm – I told him I did not want any of his tricks – he then stopped quiet for a long time and I had a bit of a close like a sleep – he caught hold of me again with one hand over my breast and got one of his legs over me and I felt his

6

privates rubbing up against my backside – I put him back and turned my back and spoke to him and asked him twice did he want to ill use me or what did he mean by what he was getting on – he did not answer me – he got up then out of the bed and went out of the room – he went out into the yard at the back. I did not know where he was to go with daylight I got up to see and saw him go into the door he had said he had closed against himself.

    By Sergeant Chandler: I know what room Mr Boddie slept in.

    By Bench: The room Mr Boddie slept in was upstairs in another house altogether

7

from the apartment I had slept in.

    By Sergeant Chandler: It was a good many yards from Mr Boddie’s room to my room – the yard is uncovered, the first time Mr Boddie came to my room he had on, as far as I could ascertain, his trousers, shirt and slippers on. When Mr Boddie first laid hold of me by the belly and privates he was awake – he kept my privates in his hand when he had hold of them. Mr Boddie did attempt to put his private parts into my backside – by pulling me in to him I mean he pulled me close to him. Mr Boddie undressed before he got into bed with me – when he got

8

his privates rubbing against me, his penis was erect – this was on the second occasion – he had his privates against my backside and had hold of me – he was awake at this time – he came into my room on more than on the two occasions already stated – he had come into my room on business several times both before and afterwards with letters etc. By Bench: He did sleep with me on one occasion after the recurrence of the two occasions before mentioned. By Sergeant Chandler: I cannot tell how long after – he did do something – he tried to accomplish his purpose – he tried to do me over he would if I would

9

allow him.

    I mean I think he wanted to do with me and to treat me as a woman. I told him I would not have it, none from any other man – he went away he had some of his clothes off. He had no coat on but what others I could not say. He then went away.

    By Mr Manby: I am sure the first occasion that I complained against Mr Boddie was in 1855 not 1865 1865 not 1866. The third time Mr Boddie slept with me was more than twelve months from the present time – I did not speak to Mr Boddie about it afterwards I daresay it was about 4 months after the alleged offence before I

10

spoke to anyone on the subject it might be more I did not speak to the Police then. But Mr Boddie did attempt to put his private parts into my backside I mean intend to convey the same meaning on the second occasion as on the third.

    The Police did not request me Mr Creaghe and Mr Chandler did not either to make a statement. I had some conversation with Mr Chandler in reference to this matter before I came into court today – the first time I had any conversation with him was about the time of Mr Boddie’s trial at [Twofold] bay – I had some conversation with Mr

11

Bennett on this matter, it might have been about 2 months ago.

    It was after Mr Boddie left the bay on or about that time I had the conversation with Mr Bennett.

    I did have a conversation in reference to this matter with Mr Solomon in Eden – It was I said I believed him guilty – I often it was before the trial of Mr Boddie up the bay. 

    By Bench: It was general conversation with Mr Bennett I mentioned the circumstances connected with Mr Boddie.

On the second occasion my back was turned to Mr Boddie he had his arm across across me he tried to pull me either

12

over on to him.
[Signed] John Hopkins.
Signed before us at Police Station, Pambula, March 5th 1867, GP Keon, Police Magistrate.
[Signed] CH Baddeley, JP & JA Bennett, JP.

    Committed to the Gaol at Darlinghurst to await trial at the next gaol delivery. Courthouse Pambula, March 5, 1867. Bailed. Allowed himself in two hundred pounds and two in one hundred each.
[Signed] GP Keon, CH Baddeley, & JA Bennett.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

S. 1.
Recognizance of Bail.

TO WIT.     }
Be it remembered, that on the eighth day of March in the Year of Our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty seven Alexander Boddie of Eden in the Colony of New South Wales, Isabella Barclay of Eden in the said Colony, and Robert Murray of Eden in the said Colony, personally came before me the undersigned, one of Her Majesty’s Justices of the Peace for the said Colony and severally acknowledged themselves to owe to Our Lady the Queen the several sums following; (that is to say,) the said Alexander Boddie the sum of two hundred pounds and the said Isabella Barclay and Robert Murray the sum of one hundred pounds each, of good and lawful money of Great Britain, to be made and levied of their several goods and chattels, lands and tenements respectively, to the use of Our Lady, said Lady the Queen, her heirs and successors, if he the said Alexander Boddie fail in the condition endorsed.

Taken acknowledged the day and year first abovementioned at Eden in the said Colony, before me. [Signed] GP Keon, Police Magistrate.

CONDITION IN ORDINARY CASES.

The condition of the within written recognizance is such, that whereas the said Alexander Boddie was the 5th day of March charged before the Justices within mentioned, for that he did attempt to commit the crime of sodomy on one Anthony Falkner if therefore the said Alexander Boddie will appear at the next court of gaol delivery to be holden at Sydney in and for the Colony of New South Wales, on Monday the eleventh day of March inst. And there surrender himself into the custody of the Keeper of the Gaol there, and plead to such information as may be filed against him for or in respect of the charge aforesaid, and take his trial upon the same, and not depart the said Court without leave, then the said recognizance to be void, or else to stand in full force and virtue.
[Signed] A Boddie, Isabella Barclay & Robert Murray.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

(B.)

Warrant to Apprehend a Person Charged with an Indictable Offence.

To the Chief Constable of Eden, in the Colony of New South Wales, and to all other Peace Officers in the said Colony. Whereas Alexander Boddie late of Eden in the said Colony, Presbyterian Minister has this day been charged upon oath before the undersigned, one of Her Majesty’s Justices of the Peace in and for the Colony for that he on or about the month of October 1865 at Eden in the said Colony. Did attempt to commit the crime of sodomy on John Hopkins of Eden and Bombala contrary to the Act these are therefore to command you, in Her Majesty’s name, forthwith to apprehend the said Alexander Boddie and to bring him before me or some other of Her Majesty’s Justices of the Peace in and for the said Colony to answer unto the said charge, and to be further dealt with according to Law,

    Given under my hand and seal this fourth day of March in the Year of Our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty seven at Pambula, in the Colony aforesaid.
[Signed] CH Baddely, JP. 

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

(N. 11 & 12 Vic., Cap. 42.)
Statement of the Accused.

Pambula,
TO WIT.     }
Alexander Boddie stands charged before the undersigned, me one of Her Majesty’s Justices of the Peace in and for the Colony aforesaid this fifth day of March in the year of Our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty seven for that he the said Alexander Boddie did on or about the month of October 1865 at Eden in the said Colony attempt to commit the crime of sodomy on one John Hopkins of Eden and the said charge being read to the said Alexander Boddie and the witness of the prosecution, John Hopkins being examined in his presence, the said Alexander Boddie is now addressed by us as follows:- “Having heard the evidence, do you with to say anything in answer to the charge? You are not obliged to say anything unless you desire to do so; but whatever you say will be taken down in writing, and may be given in evidence against you upon trial;” whereupon the said saith as follows: “I have nothing to say.”
[Signed] GP Keon, PM. 

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

(O. 1)
Recognizance to give Evidence.

New South Wales, Pambula, 
TO WIT.                            }
Be it remembered that on the fifth day of March in the year of Our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty seven John Hopkins of Eden, Mail Contractor, and Thomas E Chandler of Eden Sergeant of Police, personally came before the undersigned, one of Her Majesty’s Justices of the Peace for the said Colony and acknowledged themselves to owe to our Sovereign Lady the Queen, the sum of £40 forty pounds each of good and lawful money of Great Britain, to be made and levied of their goods and chattels, lands and tenements, to the use of our said Lady the Queen, her Heirs and Successors, is they the said John Hopkins and JC Chandler shall fail in the condition endorsed.

Taken and acknowledged the day and year first abovementioned at Pambula in the said Colony, before. [Signed] CH Baddeley, JP.

The condition of the within written recognizance is such, that whereas one Alexander Boddie of Eden was this day charged before Justice of the Peace within mentioned for that he on or about the month of October 1865 at Eden attempted to commit the crime of sodomy if therefore they the said John Hopkins and JC Challenger shall appear at the next general gaol delivery at Darlinghurst to be holden at Sydney in and for the Colony of New South Wales, on Monday the 11th day of March inst. and they are given such evidence as the know upon an information to be then and there preferred against the said Alexander Boddie for the offence aforesaid, to the Jurors who shall pass upon the trial of the said Alexander Boddie then the said recognizance to be void, or else to stand in full force and virtue.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

In the third year of the Reign of
our Sovereign Lady Victoria, by
the Grace of God, of the United Kingdom
of Great Britain and Ireland, Queen, Defender of the Faith. 

New South Wales
TO WIT.              }
Be it remembered that the Honourable James Martin, Her Majesty’s Attorney General for the Colony of New South Wales, who prosecutes for Her Majesty in this behalf, being present in the Supreme Court, at Sydney now here on the eleventh day of March in the Year of Our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty seven at Sydney in Colony aforesaid, informs the Court, that Alexander Boddie on the 10th of October in the year of Our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty five at Eden in the Colony aforesaid, did assault one John Hopkins with intent feloniously wickedly diabolically and against the order of nature to commit and perpetrate with the said John Hopkins that detestable and abominable crime (not to be named among Christians) called buggery.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Justice Alfred Cheeke
13 March 1867

Charles Davis, Solicitor
138 Pitt Street

    In the Supreme Court of New South Wales Criminal Jurisdiction
    The Queen on the prosecution of Hopkins against Boddie, Assault with intent to commit an unnatural offence
    Wednesday 13th day of March in the year of Our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty seven.
    I order that the prisoner be remanded until the next sittings of the Criminal Court at Sydney and that bail be taken by any Justice of the Peace to Sureties in one hundred pound each or one surety in two hundred pounds and that thereupon the prisoner be discharged. 
[Signed] Alfred Cheeke. 

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Charles Davis, Solicitor
138 Pitt Street Sydney
13 March 1867

John Williams, Crown Solicitor

Sir,
    I have the honour to acquaint you that it is the intention of the Prisoner 19 to offer bail at the Gaol, Darlinghurst at 2 o’clock pm this day the proposed surety being David Burnett of Margaret Street, Carrier and proprietor of ‘Horses and Drays’ in two hundred pound.

I have the honour to be your humble servant.
[Signed] Charles Davis.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

13 March 1867

    In the Supreme Court of New South Wales Criminal Jurisdiction
    The Queen on the prosecution of Hopkins against Boddie assault- with intent to commit an unnatural offence David Burnett. On the 13th day of March in the year one thousand eight hundred and sixty seven David Burnett of 383 Elizabeth Street Sydney in the Colony of New South Wales, Gentleman, being duly sworn maketh oath and saith as follows:–
    1. I am a proprietor of ‘Drays and Horses’.
    2. I have resided for the last five years at 383 Elizabeth Street Sydney aforesaid.
    3. I am possessed of property within the Colony of New South Wales above all my first debts to an amount not less than two hundred pounds. 4. I am not surety for any other prisoner or administration of bail for any defendant in any action. [Signed] D Burnett.

Sworn by the Deponent on the day firs abovementioned at Sydney before me.
[Signature illegible].

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

S. 1.
Recognizance of Bail.

New South Wales, City of Sydney
TO WIT.                                   }
Be it remembered, that on the thirteenth day of March in the year of Our L:ord one thousand eight hundred and sixty seven David Burnett of number 383 Elizabeth Street, in the City of Sydney, in the Colony of New South Wales, Proprietor of ‘Drays and Horses’, personally came before me, the undersigned, one of Her Majesty’s Justices of the Peace for the said Colony, and acknowledged himself to owe to our Sovereign Lady the Queen the sum of two hundred pounds, of goods and lawful money of Great Britain to be made and levied of his goods and chattels, lands, and tenements respectively, to the use of our said Lady the Queen, her Heirs and Successors, if Alexander Boddie shall fail in the condition endorsed. 
[Signed] D Burnett, A Boddie.

Taken and acknowledged the day and year first abovementioned, at Sydney, and before me.
[Signed] ND Stenhouse, JP.

CONDITION IN ORDINARY CASES.

The condition of the within written Recognizance is such, that whereas Alexander Boddie was on the thirteenth day of March instant, indicted upon a certain prosecution of one Hopkins for attempting to commit an unnatural offence before His Honour Mr Justice Cheeke and a trial of the said Alexander Boddie being postponed till the next criminal sittings of the Supreme Court to be holden on the thirteenth day of May next at Darlinghurst. If therefore the said Alexander Boddie shall appear at the next sittings to be holden at the City of Sydney in and for the Colony of New South Wales, on the thirteenth day of May at 9 of the clock in the forenoon, and then and there surrender himself into the custody of the Keeper of the Gaol there, and plead to such information as may be filed against him for or in respect of the charge aforesaid, and take his trial upon the same, and not depart the said Court without leave, then the said Recognizance to be void, or else to stand in full force and virtue.
[Signed] DN Stenhouse, JP.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Justice Cheeke
13 March 1867

In the Supreme Court of NSW
Criminal Jurisdiction              }
The Queen on the prosecution of Hopkins against Boddie assault with intent to commit and unnatural offence.
    Wednesday the thirteenth day of March in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty seven

    I order that the prisoner be remanded until the next sittings of the Criminal Court at Sydney and that Bail (to be approved of by John Williams, Crown Solicitor) be taken by any Justice of the peace two sureties in one hundred pounds or one surety in two hundred pounds and that thereupon the prisoner be discharged.
[Signed Justice] Alfred Cheeke.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

[The above Justice Cheeke letter has two (n.d.) notes by the John Williams, Crown Solicitor stating]

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

This order is not correct, the order made by the Judge was that the bail should be approved by me and then Mr Davis has (?) to insert in this order.
[Signed] John Williams, [CS].

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Mr Burnett (proprietor of ‘Drays and Horses’) is proposed as bail in £200.–
    Mr Burnett’s address is Margaret Street.
    I consent to Mr Burnett being (?) (?) (?) (?) (?) (?) (?) in £200.–
[Signed] John Williams, Crown Solicitor.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

[On the depositions’ cover sheet is the following]

No. 236
Depositions
5th March, 1867
Regina v. Boddie
Indecent assault
Next Sydney Gaol delivery being at 12 March 1867
Attempt to commit sodomy
Witness: Thomas C Chandler, John Hopkins
Pambula
March 5th 1867 

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Justice A Cheeke’s Notebook 20 21

69

[1st trial, Sydney, 13 March 1867]
Alexander Boddie
Attempt at Sodomy

    John Alexander. Farmer & grazier (at ?) Twofold Bay. Prisoner is a Presb[yterian] Minister – I have known him about 2 years. He visited me ministerially and mainly he resided at Eden. 2nd January 1866 he came to my house between 8 & 9 o’clock in the evening. I was in bed. Mrs Alexander was away. I went to prepare a bed. He said he had no objections if I had not of sleeping with me. We both undressed and went to bed, fell asleep – I was awoke by feel [sic–feeling] my shirt up and his yard touching me – his yard touched my person – my bum.

70

I shoved him off – I thought he was asleep – I was again awoke – he was trying to put his yard into my bum. I pushed him off saying. Did I think he was sleeping with a woman. I shoved him off – he made no answer – I did not go to sleep a third time. He tried the same thing again when I shoved him off and got out of bed – second and third time I believe he was awake – In the morning he seemed ashamed. He had his breakfast and I accompanied part of his journey to Mr Weather Head according to my promise made (previously ?) – I said nothing

71

to him about it at that time – He has slept at my house (since ?) when (marching ?) sometimes. I refused to admit in consequence of some information I received. I said I know it from my own experience and what (brother ? passim) had told me not to come to my house any more. If I encouraged him I should be as bad as he was – I was (?) and said that my brother had told me that he had committed same offence on my brother.

    Cross-examined. Had known him for 12 months. Generally he stopped at my place every 3 weeks – slept there – (?) (?) (?) (?) (?) never made any proposition to me to commit the offence – When I got up I did not see (whether ?) he was asleep. Happened 13 months ago. I made no allusion to the affair.

72

The first time I charged prisoner was when he committed the offence on my brother may be 9 months, certainly 7 or 8 – I heard from my brother perhaps (2 ?) weeks before I turned prisoner out of the house. At the Police Office Davidson (?) I (?) (were called ?) and (examined ?). I had a child die on Sept. 25th buried at Eden. Prisoner read the burial service. I told him the child was dead. He said he would come down and bury the child. I had not then turned Prisoner out of the house – (not ?) accused of (stealing ?) but of (?) (?) of Weather Head (?) (?) (?) I charged prisoner with (telling ?) Weather Head – and (advising ?) him about (?) (?) – Once accused

73

of (?) (?) had been acquitted. Inspector of Police (filed ?) (?) Information (?) (?) to charge to (?) (?) I had turned prisoner out of my house – I was fearful to mention it (fearing ?) the (?) would (ruin ?) me. I could not think he would attempt it with another person. I heard Davidson said he knew nothing about what I called him for. Don’t recollect what Lees said. 

    Dalley to the Jury (affecting ?) speech as to prisoner pleading guilty.
Conduct and probability with reference to (?) in the present charge.
2nd January (the act ?)
Conduct after sufficient to raise reasonable doubt. Heard from the brother ... and the (?) (?). If consenting equally guilty.
Not Guilty

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Thu 14 Mar 1867 22

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT
WEDNESDAY [13 MARCH 1867]
Before his Honor Mr Justice Alfred Cheeke

ASSAULT WITH INTENT 

Justice Alfred Cheeke. Australian Town and Country Journal, Sat 19 Sep 1874, p. 453. Image: Reproduction: Peter de Waal
Justice Alfred Cheeke. Image: Australian Town
and Country 
Journal, Sat 19 Sep 1874, p. 453.
Reproduction: Peter de Waal

    Alexander Boddie was indicted for having, on the 10th October 1865, at Eden, Twofold Bay, committed an assault upon John Hopkins, with intent to commit an unnatural crime.

    The prisoner pleaded not guilty, and was defended by Mr Dalley, instructed by Mr Manby. The Solicitor General prosecuted for the Crown.

    The SOLICITOR GENERAL applied for the postponement of the case until the next  assizes, as he had only received a copy of the depositions on the previous evening. The application was granted, and his Honor ordered the remand of the prisoner  until the sitting of the Court in May next.

    Mr DALLEY, on behalf of the prisoner, applied for bail, which was granted – the prisoner in £200, and two sureties in £100 each.

    The Court then rose, adjourning to the 13th May next.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Mail, Sat 16 Mar 1867 23

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.
MONDAY.

Before his Honor Mr Justice CHEEKE.
...

WEDNESDAY.

ASSAULT WITH INTENT.

    Alexander Boddie was indicted for having, on the 10th October, 1866, at Eden, Twofold Bay, committed an assault upon John Hopkins, with intent to commit an unnatural crime.

    The prisoner pleaded not guilty, and was defended by Mr Dalley, instructed by Mr Manby. The Solicitor- General prosecuted for the Crown.

    The SOLICITOR-GENERAL applied for the postponement of the case until the next assizes, as he had only received a copy of the depositions on the previous evening.

    The application was granted, and his Honor ordered the remand of the prisoner until the sitting of the Court in May next.

    Mr DALLEY, on behalf of the prisoner, applied for bail, which was granted—the prisoner in £200, and two sureties in £100 each.

    The Court then rose, adjourning to the 13th May next.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser, Tue 19 Mar 1867 24

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.
WEDNESDAY.
———
(From the SM Herald.)
(Before his Honor Mr Justice Cheeke.)

    Alexander Boddie was indicted for having, on the 10th October, 1865, [sic] at Eden, Twofold Bay, committed an assault upon John Hopkins, with intent to commit an unnatural crime. The prisoner pleaded not guilty, and was defended by Mr Dalley, instructed by Mr Manby. The Solicitor-General (who prosecuted for the Crown) applied for the postponement of the case until the next assizes, as he had only received a copy of the depositions on the previous evening. The application was granted, and his Honor ordered the remand of the prisoner until the sitting of the Court in May next. Mr Dalley, on behalf of the prisoner, applied for bail, which was granted—the prisoner in £200, and two sureties in £100 each.—The Court then rose, adjourning to the 13th May next.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Justice A Cheeke’s Notebook 25

180

[2nd trial, Sydney, 15 May 1867]
    Alexander Boddie Assault with intent to commit sodomy.

(Constable’s Statement:) At Eden apprehended prisoner 4th March charge with assault to commit sodomy on John Hopkins – he made no reply – I received Information from Hopkins before arrest & from another person.

     Cross-examined by Dalley. Prisoner was (tried ?) on another charge & acquitted and immediately I arrested the prisoner upon the present charge – 7th (February ?) received from Hopkins the Information and before (I ?) (?) (in the other ?) charge.

    John Hopkins living at Eden Mail Contracting – I have known the prisoner for some time & prisoner stopped at the same place that I stopped at to stay. (As ?) (late ?) [as] 1865 he was (here ?)

181

he stopped with me – and one night he came to me on the 9th October 1865. It was my bed room. I was asleep. Door was closed not locked. He said he could not get back to his own room that he had closed the door. Asked me to let him sleep with me. I said yes. It was a large bed. He undressed and went to bed. He first (commenced ?) handled me all over, took hold of my privates and put his legs over me. He tried to turn me first then he asked me to turn – tried to put his legs over me – my back was next to him. I felt his private parts to my backside. It was between my legs. I felt he tried – I said stop quiet what do you want to do are you mad. His  privates were then (erect ?) and against me – He then stopped quiet – got up and went away from my bed room – (second ?) time he tried to get his legs over me during the same night.

182

    He pulled me close to him his private parts being at same position as first time – I said (?) (because ?) I would not have it. He got up and went away – He did not speak to me when I spoke to him. I made no report to the Police, I was frightened – I mentioned it to others and it was reported and I was (subpoenaed ?) by the Police.

    Cross-examined by Dalley. From (Oct ?) to (April ?) I made no charge – I did not like to mention it because I was ashamed and thought I should not be believed – hear [sic–here] two years. I knew the prisoner 3 years from the time prisoner stopped at Mrs Bailley’s from the time he arrived at Eden – and I knew him from his first arrival at (?) – I know of no charge against me of intoxication laid against me by prisoner Boddie to my knowledge – I knew Alexander

183

the (former ?) (prosecutor ?) against Boddie for some (6 ?) years by sight, for 2 years to speak to him. I had conversations with him before prisoner was acquitted and (after ?). Boddie (?) (?) my charge against Boddie in April was heard at the Police Office. I was sober at the night in question. I left Mrs Bailley. I (said ? saw ?) she was not satisfied – and I left. Took no memorandum of 16 date – it was impressed forcibly on my memory on the following day – 1864 mailman for 3 (years ?) – I was perfectly sober. (Allowed ?) prisoner in my bed an hour or an hour & half – I dozed not slept 15 or 20 minutes when he first commenced liberties – first thing he did was to begin to handle me then he got hold of my privates then his legs (over ?) me his hand being across me, his privates between my legs – I said Do you stop quiet (?) you are mad. I did not speak until I found his privates between my legs. I did not get up. Did not throw prisoner out of bed – I went after into the bed – when he again (tried ?) me in about 15 (minutes ?) (the ?) (same ?) (manner ?) I was on my left side nearest to wall – bed close to wall. All my back was again exposed – he approached me – I had a day shirt on – he again had his legs over me. Hands again over me,

184

again took my private parts and when he put his legs over me I said I would not have it – I was ashamed. I didn’t speak to him about it. He was 2 hours in the room with me. He had trowsers, shirt & slippers, he took his trowsers off and he put them on again before he left – saw Boddie a week after and spoke to him at Mrs Bailley’s. Always spoke to him same way as before the assault.

    [Mr] Dalley to the Jury – revolting details of such an offence. (Easily ?) proved, most difficult to be disproved. 26

    Offence Oct 1865 to March 1867 –

    Has he accounted for the delay in making the charge. Does (that ? such ?) delay not throw reasonable doubt upon his evidence. His (?) and conduct.

Not Guilty.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Thu 16 May 1867 27

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT
WEDNESDAY [15 MAY 1867]

...

SECOND COURT.

    Before Mr Justice Cheeke and a jury of twelve.
...

UNNATURAL OFFENCE

    Alexander Boddie was indicted for an unnatural crime alleged to have been committed upon one John Hopkins, at Eden, on the 9th October 1865.

    Mr Butler prosecuted for the Crown, and the prisoner was defended by Mr Dalley.

    Prisoner was acquitted.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser, Sat 18 May 1867 28

GENERAL NEWS.
———— 

...

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.
————
WEDNESDAY.

...

SECOND COURT.
(Before Mr Justice Cheeke.)

...
    Alexander Boddie was indicted for an unnatural crime alleged to have been committed upon one John Hopkins,at Eden, on the 9th of October, 1865. Acquitted.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Minutes of Proceedings of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church of NSW, 1865-1868 29

Roll of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church of NSW.
September, 1865

...

Presbytery of Sydney.

...

 Ministers.  Date of Ordination.   Charges.   Elders. 
 Alexander Boddie  1864  Twofold Bay   

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Roll of th General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church of NSW.
October, 1866 

 

Presbytery of Sydney.

...

 Ministers.  Charges.   Elders. 
 Alexander Boddie  Twofold Bay   

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Roll of th General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church of NSW.
October, 1867

...

Presbytery of Sydney.

...

 Ministers.  Date of Ordination.   Charges.   Elders. 
 (Vacant)    Eden, Pambula, and Bega  

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Roll of th General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church of NSW. 
October, 1868

...

Presbytery of Sydney.

...

 Ministers.  Date of Ordination.   Charges.   Elders. 
 (Vacant)    Eden, Pambula, and Bega  

  


1  Rev Mr Boddie arrived in Sydney from London on 14th January 1864 aboard the Damascus. On the same vessel travelled the following Rev Messrs: Bourne, Brenwell, Manning, Sellers, Stead who also disembarked at Sydney.

2  The Sydney Morning Herald, Tue 26 Jan 1864, p. 4.

3  Rev James Cameron, Centenary History of the Presbyterian Church in NSW, Angus and Robertson, 1905, pp. 65, 291, 295.

4  Rev Robert Steel, The Presbyterian Magazine, 1865, p. 218.

5  The Bega Gazette and County of Auckland Advertiser, Sat 2 Jun 1866, p. 2. Damaged newspaper hence not all text available.

6  Empire, Wed 20 Sep 1865, p. 2. Emphasis added.

7  The Bega Gazette and Eden District or Southern Coast Advertiser, Sat 2 Jun 1866, p. 2.

8  Gippsland Times, Thu 10 Jan 1867, p. 3.

9  Gippsland Times, Thu 17 Jan 1867, p. 3.

10 Gippsland Times, Thu 24 Jan 1867, p. 3.

11 The Sydney Morning Herald, Thu 7 Feb 1867, p. 5. Emphasis added.

12 The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser, Sat 9 Feb 1867, p. 4.

13 The Sydney Morning Herald, Fri 15 Feb 1867, p. 2.

14 The Sydney Morning Herald, Sat 16 Feb 1867, p. 8.

15 Gippsland Times, Sat 23 Feb 1867, p. 2.

16 Rev CA White, The Challenge of the Years, Angus and Robertson, Sydney, 1951, p 554.

17 SRNSW: NRS880, [9/6493], Supreme Court, Papers and depositions, Sydney, 1867, No. 236. Emphasis added.

When there’s mention, in the depositions, about a previous trial at the Bay, this is Twofold Bay. Checked through R2680, R2681– Eden court of petty sessions to see if I could find the previous trial mentioned. Nothing found.

19 Mn: Queen v. Boddie assault

20 SRNSW: NRS5775, [2/2521], Judiciary, A Cheeke, J. Notebooks Criminal Sessions, 1865-74, pp. 69-73. Emphasis added.

21 Alfred Cheeke was born on 10 Mar 1810 at Evesham, Worcestershire, England. He was educated privately by tutors and at Cambridge university. Cheeke was called to the Bar of the Middle Temple on 29 Jan 1836 and joined the Oxford Circuit. He arrived in NSW in Oct 1837 and became a magistrate in 1838. Jun 1841 saw him appointed as crown prosecutor in the Courts of QS involving frequent country district visits this enabling Cheeke to satisfy his great fondness for equestrian travel. After holding various judicial positions, and seeking to enter politics once in 1856, Cheeke was appointed a puisne judge of the NSW Supreme Court on 22 Jun 1865. Alfred became serious ill and on 14 Mar 1876 died from suppressed gout at his residence in Darling Point Road, adjoining St Mark’s Church rectory. His St Jude’s cemetery tomb at Randwick bears the incorrect name as Cheek. ADB, 1851-1890, vol. 3, pp. 384-5.

22 The Sydney Morning Herald, Thu 14 Mar 1867, p. 2.

23 The Sydney Mail, Sat 16 Mar 1867, p.3.

24 The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser, Tue 19 Mar 1867, p. 4.

25 SRNSW: NRS5775, [2/2521], Judiciary, A Cheeke, J. Notebooks Criminal Sessions, 1865-74, pp. 180-4. Emphasis added.

26 Mn: Alexander’s prosecution (13th ?) February

27 The Sydney Morning Herald, Thu 16 May 1867, p. 2.

28 The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser, Sat 18 May 1867, p. 4.

29 Minutes of Proceedings of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church of NSW, Sep 1865; Oct 1866; Oct 1867; Oct 1868.