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1887, James Henry Dring - Unfit For Publication
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Below also see: John Dring, 1914

 

The Shoalhaven Telegraph, Wed 5 Jan 1887 1

SHOALHAVEN COURT OF
PETTY SESSIONS.
————
Tuesday, January 4, 1886. [sic–1887]
(Before Messrs ZG Bice, J Glanville, Jas Monaghan,
John Monaghan, J Green, and Dr King, JsP)

(The Court here adjourned until 2 o’clock.)
(Before Messrs ZG Bice, John Glanville, Jas Monaghan, and
John Monaghan, JsP)

    James Henry Dring was charged with forging a certain order for passage by steamer Meeinderry with intent to defraud William Upton.

    Mr Davey watched the case on behalf of the Crown.

    William Upton deposed: My information is true; the defendant is the man I charge; (the Clerk of Petty Sessions here read the evidence taken at his arrest); I know the prisoner; he was in my employ; I took him out of pity, as he said he had been ill and did not want wages; I said I would give him 2s 6d a week; when he left, he said he must be in Sydney, or he would lose £50; I gave him £2; I think he left on Wednesday; I paid him in full; I never gave him an order to the captain for a passage by the Meeinderry; (order produced); it is not my handwriting; I paid the amount, because I was ignorant of the law, and thought I was bound to pay it; I paid 22s 6d to Mrs Cruikshanks; the prisoner has since confessed his guilt to me; I produce a letter which I received from the prisoner (the letter was here read by Mr Lovegrove); I sent a telegram to prisoner telling him I would write; the reason I did so was to keep him quiet until I heard from Elliott and Clarke; I had no intention of abandoning the prosecution; I laid my information on the 20th; the letter I wrote to him I addressed to Picton, as he requested in his letter; I never instructed prisoner to draw the order, nor to obtain a passage from the captain of the Meeinderry.

    By Mr Davey: I am perfectly clear that I over paid prisoner when he left.

    By prisoner: I remember the morning you went away; I do not remember seeing you when I was bringing up the cows; I did not say that I was sorry you were going away that day, as I had only £2 in the house; I did not go into the house to you; I gave you £2 at the door; you never spoke to me about the order; I did not tell you to write it yourself, as it was all the same; you did write some notes to storekeepers for me; you wrote to Mr McArthur, and signed my name to it by my order; I never had cause to complain about you until now.

    Captain A Hoffman deposed: I am master of the Meeinderry; on the 1st of December the prisoner came on board my vessel; he gave me the order produced, signed by William Upton, and I issued a ticket for £1 2s 6d, as I knew the name was good, and believed the order was correct; the amount has been paid by Mr Upton.

    Prisoner, who reserved his defence, was committed to take his trial at the next Sydney Gaol delivery on the 1st March.

    The same prisoner [James Henry Dring] was then charged by William James Upton with having on the 6th December falsely pretended to Elliott and Clarke, (of Sydney), that he was William Upton, and thereby obtained the sum of £2, with intent to defraud.

    Prisoner pleaded guilty, (he said) “on purpose that their Worships might deal with the case.”

    Sentenced to two months’ imprisonment in Darlinghurst Gaol.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Mon 14 Mar 1887 2

NEWS OF THE DAY.
———◦———


    THE following cases have been set down for hearing at the sittings of the Central Criminal Court, which are to commence at Darlinghurst this morning, before Mr Acting-Judge Stephen:—Donald Kennedy, attempted heinous crime; James Henry Dring, forgery; Thomas Egan, assault with intent to commit a capital offence; James Bennett, assault upon a girl by her father; Lionel Lee and others, conspiracy; Francis RL Rossi, obstructing a clergyman; Thomas Gillanders and another, [William Hargraves] attempted heinous crime; Alick Lee, attempt to murder; Evan A Cameron, Patrick James Flynn, and George Page, criminal assault; Charles Laurence, rape; George Perkins, forgery and uttering (four charges); Thomas O’Malley, bigamy. Several other committals have taken place, the particulars of which had not been recorded on Saturday.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Sat 2 Apr 1887 3

METROPOLITAN QUARTER SESSIONS.

    The following is the list of cases set down for hearing at the Metropolitan Quarter Sessions, which will open on Monday under the presidency of his Honor Judge Backhouse:—

    James Henry Dring, forging a request for giving credit;

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Tue 5 Apr 1887 4

METROPOLITAN QUARTER SESSIONS.—
MONDAY, APRIL 4.
(Before his Honor Mr District Court Judge Backhouse.)

    The sittings of the Metropolitan Quarter Sessions commenced at the Courthouse, Darlinghurst, to-day.
    Mr PJ Healey, assisted by Mr TC O’Mara, conducted the prosecution on behalf of the Crown.
    The following jurors were fined 40s each for non-attendance:—James Steenson, jun, tailor, 663 George-street; Thomas Cale, tinsmith, New Canterbury-road, Petersham; Joseph Tracey, stonemason, 45, Belvin-street; George Darby, baker, Corso, Manly.

CHARGE OF FORGING AND UTTERING.

    James Henry Dring was arraigned on a charge of forging a certain document purported to be signed by one William James Upton,  of Bolong, near Shoalhaven, on December 1 last. He was further charged on another count with uttering the said document with intent to defraud. It seems that the accused was in the employ of Mr Upton for about six months. On the 1st December last he left his employ, and on the strength of a written request which purported to be signed by Upton, he procured a return passage to the metropolis by a steamer running between Shoalhaven and Sydney. Mr Upton said he had received a letter from the agents of the steamer asking for the amount of Dring’s passage money, and he had paid it. He had not signed the written request which Dring had given to the captain of the steamer. The captain of the vessel deposed that the prisoner had tendered the document purported to be signed by Upton to him, and that the accused had been conveyed to Sydney. Dring made a long statement to the effect that he was proof warranted in using Upton’s name, as he had been in the habit of signing orders, letters, and receipts for him during the six months he was in his employ. He also urged that he had not committed forgery, and had no intention of doing so, but that having written orders for Upton, he impliedly had the right to use Upton’s signature in connection with the particular order which he was charged with forging. After a brief deliberation the jury returned a verdict of guilty against the prisoner on both counts, with a strong recommendation  to mercy. The prisoner was remanded until Wednesday for sentence.

    The Court rose at 5.10 pm.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Thu 7 Apr 1887 5

METROPOLITAN QUARTER SESSIONS.
WEDNESDAY.
(Before Mr District Court Judge BACKHOUSE.)

    The sittings of the Metropolitan Quarter Sessions were continued at the Court-house, Darlinghurst, this morning.

    Mr Herbert Harris conducted the prosecutions on behalf of the Crown.

FINE REMITTED.

    In the case of George Darby, a juror, who was fined 40s on Monday for non-attendance, his Honor remitted the fine, Darby having given good reasons for his absence.

SENTENCES.


    James Henry Dring, convicted of forgery and uttering, was placed in the dock to receive sentence.

    His Honor said: James Henry Dring you have been found guilty of forgery and uttering. The jury brought in in your case a strong recommendation to mercy. If it were not for that I should deal with you more severely than, I intend to. I consider you have behaved very badly indeed to Upton. It is your first offence, and I therefore sentence you to be kept in Wollongong gaol for 12 months with hard labour. I send you and the other prisoner to Wollongong gaol for the simple reason that I do not wish you to be associated with older criminals. I think our country gaols might very often be used in such cases, and in this way our gaols may, perhaps, be made more efficacious than they are.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

James Henry Dring, Gaol photo sheet 6

SRNSW: NRS2138, [3/6048], Darlinghurst Gaol photographic description book, 1886-1887, No. 3832, p. 73, R5102.


Gaol Photo Sheet - 
Transcribed Details

No. 3832
191.87

Date when Portrait was taken: 22-1-1887

Name: James Henry Dring

Native place: England

Year of birth: 1849

Arrived       Ship:
in Colony }   Year:

Trade or occupation
previous to conviction  } Gardener
Religion: Ch Eng

Education, degree of: R & W

Height: 5' 6"

Weight     On committal: 125
in lbs     } On discharge:

Colour of hair: Sandy

Colour of eyes: Blue

Marks or special features: Cast in right eye. Mole on left cheek

Where and when tried: Sydney Q.S.
4 April 1887

Offence: Forgery & Uttering

Sentence: 12 months HL Wollongong Gaol

 

Remarks:—Guilty

 (No. of Previous Portrait ...  ) 

PREVIOUS CONVICTIONS

Where and When Offence. Sentence

Nowra PC

  4

 1

1887

False pretences

2 months C

 


 

John Dring, 1914

 

The Sydney Morning Herald, Fri 3 Jul 1914 7

LAW NOTICES.
————
FRIDAY JULY 3.

QUARTER SESSIONS.

    David McCall and Henry Douglas, inflicting grievous bodily harm; John Dring, assault.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Daily Telegraph, Sat 4 Jul 1914 8

QUARTER SESSIONS.
————
(Before Judge Docker and a jury.)

    Mr RJ Browning, Crown Prosecutor.

TWO YEARS' IMPRISONMENT.

    John Dring, an elderly man, denied having committed a serious offence, [indecently assaulting, William John Thorsley (aka Thorsby) , 11 years and 11 months], at Ryde on May 28. He conducted his own defence.

    The jury returned a verdict of guilty, after a brief retirement, and Dring was sentenced to two years’ imprisonment, with hard labor, at Grafton Gaol. His Honor took into consideration prisoner’s advanced age, and remarked that such an offence entailed liability to five years’ penal servitude. Dring had been convicted of false pretences a good many years ago.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Sat 4 Jul 1914 9

QUARTER SESSIONS.
(Before Judge Docker and a jury.)

    Mr RJ Browning, Crown Prosecutor.

CONVICTED OF A SERIOUS OFFENCE.

    John Dring, an elderly man, was convicted on a charge of having committed a serious offence at Ryde on May 28. He conducted his own defence.

    Dring was sentenced to two years’ imprisonment in Grafton Gaol. His Honor said that the prisoner had committed an offence for which he was liable to five years’ penal servitude, and in imposing a lighter sentence he had taken his age into consideration.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

John Dring, Gaol photo sheet template 10

SRNSW: NRS2138, [3/6086], Darlinghurst Gaol photographic description book, 1913-1914, No. 13739, p. 97, R5117.


Gaol Photo Sheet - 
Transcribed Details

No. 13739

Date when Portrait was taken: 4-7-1914

Name: John Dring
(aka John Henry Dring)

Native place: England

Year of birth: 22-2-1847

Arrived       Ship: Leicester
in Colony }   Year: 1876

Trade or occupation
previous to conviction  } Gardener

Religion: C of E

Education, degree of: R and W

Height: 5' 5¼"

Weight     On committal: 132
in lbs     } On discharge:

Colour of hair: Brown

Colour of eyes: Blue

Marks or special features: Both hands contracted from rheumatism, scar on bridge of nose large ulcer on left shin walks with a stick

Where and when tried: Sydney Q.S. 
4 April 1887

Offence: Forgery & Uttering

Sentence: 12 months HL Wollongong Gaol

 

Remarks:—Guilty

 (No. of Previous Portrait ... Darlinghurst 3832  ) 

PREVIOUS CONVICTIONS

Where and When Offence. Sentence

Sydney Q.S.

  3

 7 

1914

Indecent assault on a male person

2 years HL

And 2 previous convictions for which see Photo No. as above

 

 


1     The Shoalhaven Telegraph, Wed 5 Jan 1887, p. 2. Emphasis added.

2     The Sydney Morning Herald, Mon 14 Mar 1887, p. 7. Emphasis added.

3     The Sydney Morning Herald, Sat 2 Apr 1887, p. 10.

4     The Sydney Morning Herald, Tue 5 Apr 1887, p. 6.

5     The Sydney Morning Herald, Thu 7 Apr 1887, p. 5. Emphasis added.

6     SRNSW: NRS2138, [3/6048], Darlinghurst Gaol photographic description book, 1886-1887, No. 3832, p. 73, R5102.

7     The Sydney Morning Herald, Fri 3 Jul 1914, p. 5. Emphasis added.

8     The Daily Telegraph, Sat 4 Jul 1914, p. 21.

9     The Sydney Morning Herald, Sat 4 Jul 1914, p. 9.

10   SRNSW: NRS2138, [3/6086], Darlinghurst Gaol photographic description book, 1913-1914, No. 13739, p. 97, R5117.