Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /nfs/c07/h03/mnt/178353/domains/unfitforpublication.org.au/html/plugins/system/gantry/gantry.php on line 406
1901, Albert Edward Con Fue - Unfit For Publication
Text Size

 

 

The Hillston Spectator and Lachlan River Advertiser, Sat 25 May 1901 1

POLICE COURT.
———✣———
Friday, 24th instant, before FP
Meares, Esq, PM.)

    Albert Edward Confu [sic] was charged with an abominable offence.

    Constable Marshall, stationed at Gunbar, gave evidence of arrest.

    Accused was remanded till Saturday morning.

Saturday, 25th May.

    Albert Edward Confu, charged on remand from the previous day with an abominable offence.

    Robert Walter Stewart and Constable Fowler gave evidence.

    Accused was committed for trial to the Quarter Sessions on the 16th July.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Riverine Grazier, Mon 22 Jul 1901 2

HAY QUARTER SESSIONS.
———
Saturday, July 20.

    This Court was opened on Saturday before his Honor Judge Docker. Mr H Harris prosecuted for the Crown. The other legal gentlemen present were—Messrs LSC Robertson, CW Alexander, EW Wilkinson, and SP Kemp.

DESTROYING A LETTER SENT BY POST.

    John Rosman was charged with destroying a letter sent by post the property of the Postmaster-General.

    Mr Robertson appeared for the accused, who pleaded guilty.

    The Crown Prosecutor said nothing was known of the accused, and the police gave the boy a good character.

    Alfred Edward Confue [aka Con Fue], 19 years of age, was charged with bestiality at Hillston.

    The accused pleaded guilty.

    His Honor discharged the jury, and congratulated the district on its freedom from crime, as he understood that one of the cases had not come from this district. He would read the depositions in the two cases, and would then hear Mr Robertson in John Rosman’s defence.

    Mr Robertson handed in several letters as to character. He asked his Honor to deal with the boy under the First Offenders’ Act . He also handed in a letter from a gentleman offering to take and educate the boy if he was discharged, and also a telegram from the Vicar of Urana saying that the gentleman would be a good man to have control of the boy. The boy was left on the world, and he asked his Honor to give the lad a chance.

    His Honor passed sentence of six months in the Hay Gaol on the accused, but to be suspended under the First Offenders’ Act on finding sureties of £40 for his good behaviour for six months. It was a serious charge and the boy could have got seven years. He trusted that it would be a lesson to him, and in the future he would do what was right.

    The Crown Prosecutor said that the Government was to blame in accepting the tender of men at low prices, which made them engage boys to do work at low wages, and they were put in the way of temptation.

    His Honor in addressing Albert Edward Confue said that this was a very bad case. The law said that he must pass a sentence of five years penal servitude, which he did. He would give him leave to petition for release after three years.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Sydney Morning Herald, Mon 22 Jul 1901 3

HAY QUARTER SESSIONS.
———◦———

Hay, Saturday.

    The Hay Quarter Sessions were opened to-day before Judge Docker.

    Albert Edward Confue, aged 20 years, pleaded guilty to a serious charge, the offence having been committed at Hillston, and was sentenced to five years’ imprisonment. The Judge said that was the minimum punishment prescribed by the law, and he gave accused permission to petition, at the end of three years, for a remission of the balance of the sentence.

    The civil cases were unimportant in character.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Riverine Grazier, Tue 23 Jul 1901 4

HAY QUARTER SESSIONS.
———✦———

    The Hay Court of Quarter Sessions was held on Saturday. His Honor Judge Docker presided, and Mr Harris prosecuted on behalf pf the Crown.

    The following cases were heard:—

DESTROYING A LETTER.

    John Rosman was charged for that he did on the 4th April wilfully destroy a certain letter sent by mail, the property of Postmaster-General.

    Mr Robertson appeared for the accused, who pleaded guilty.

    The Crown Prosecutor said that nothing was known against the lad’s character.

    Mr Robertson produced some letters bearing on the lad’s character, some of the writers being in court. He made an application that His Honor would deal with the case under the First Offenders’ Act . The boy would be 16 years of age on the 31st July. He had no father, and his mother, who had married again, would have nothing to do with him. He had a letter from a gentleman in Urana, Mr Bowes, offering to take care of the boy, and treat him as his own, and a telegram from the vicar of Urana stating that Mr Bowes was a respectable and responsible person. One of the letters was from Mr Campbell, who said he had never missed anything. He mentioned that because it was in the lower court that parts of a letter bearing Mr Campbell’s name had been found on the road.

    His Honor: Of course, if a man does not get a letter, he does not know that it has been sent. He cannot miss it.

    Mr Robertson said he admitted that the tearing of the letter was a wrong thing to do, but he asked His Honor to believe that it was a stupid freak.

    His Honor asked what the prisoner’s wages were.

    The accused: Clothes and keep!

    Mr Robertson said the accused had been nearly twelve months with Mr McClelland. He was engaged at 4s per week.

    His Honor: Did you get that money?

    The accused: I got it for the six months, and then a fresh arrangement was made.

    Mr Robertson pointed out that, in his evidence, the assistant postmaster had said the boy had never previously given trouble.

    The Judge said, addressing the accused, I have to pass sentence upon you. It is a serious offence for which you might be sentenced to seven years’ imprisonment. I hope you have not taken any money, but it looks as if you have taken money from letters. It was a very foolish, as well as a very wrong act, because a boy ruins all his prospects in life by dishonesty of that kind. You cannot be employed any more in that capacity. A young fellow of fifteen could not expect to earn very much, but by faithful service you might have expected something better. I hope Mr Bowes will take you and give you a good training, and that you will redeem your character and become a good man. The sentence of the Court is that you be imprisoned with hard labor in Hay gaol for six months, but that sentence will be suspended on your entering into sureties; yourself in £20, which is a matter of form, and two sureties of £20 each, or one of £40.

    Mr Robertson thanked his Honor.

    Mr Harris said that he was extremely pleased his Honor had seen fit to take a lenient view of the case. The postal authorities should not allow boys to be employed by mail contractors.

    His Honor: I suppose the postal authorities accept the lowest tender for mail services.

    Mr Harris said they did, but it led to services being let at prices which were too low, and it proved very inconvenient to the public, because they had to travel in carriages not fit to travel in. That was all owing to what he considered to be the absurd principle of accepting the lowest tender.

    His Honor said that was a matter for policy with which he had nothing to do. He could see difficulties in the way of any other course. The Postmaster-General was concerned in the revenue, and if he did not accept the lowest tender the charge of favoritism [sic] came in.

    Mr Harris thought the price should not be so low that the work could not be carried out under proper conditions.

AN UNNATURAL OFFENCE.

    Albert Edward Con Fue, a young man of about 20 years of age, was charged with committing an unnatural offence at Hillston on the 18th May.

    Accused, who was undefended, pleaded guilty, and said he had nothing to say.
    His Honor, addressing the prisoner, said that the law provided a very heavy punishment for the offence to which he had pleaded guilty. At one time it was punishable by hanging—it was now punishable by imprisonment for life. The lowest punishment that could be imposed was imprisonment for five years, and he would impose that sentence upon the prisoner, but he would give him leave to petition for the remission of the balance of the sentence when he had served three years. He did not promise to recommend the remission of the sentence—that would depend upon several questions, principally the prisoner’s conduct in gaol.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Hillston Spectator and Lachlan River Advertiser, Sat 27 Jul 1901 5

    At the Hay Quarter Sessions before Judge Docker, Albert Edward Con Fue, a young man of about 20 years of age, was charged with committing an unnatural offence at Hillston on the 18th May. Accused, who was undefended, pleaded guilty, and said he had nothing to say. His Honor, addressing the prisoner, said that the law provided a very heavy punishment for the offence to which he had pleaded guilty. At one time it was punishable by hanging—it was now punishable by imprisonment for life. The lowest punishment that could be imposed was imprisonment for five years, and he would impose that sentence upon the prisoner, but he would give him leave to petition for the remission of the balance of the sentence when he had served three years. He did not promise to recommend the remission of the sentence—that would depend on several questions, principally the prisoner’s conduct in gaol.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~


Albert Edward Con Fue, Gaol photo sheet 6

SRNSW: NRS2232, [3/5973], Goulburn Gaol photographic description book, 12 Oct 1899- 25 Mar 1902, No. 1508, p. 186, R5120.


Gaol Photo Sheet - 
Transcribed Details

No. 1508
Goulburn

Date when Portrait was taken: 4-9-1901

Name: Albert Edward Con Fue

Native place: Queensland

Year of birth: 1882

Arrived       Ship:
in Colony }   Year: BS

Trade or occupation
previous to conviction  } Groom & Laborer

Religion: Wesleyan

Education, degree of: R & W

Height: 5' 1¾"

Weight     On committal: 156
in lbs     } On discharge:

Colour of hair: Black

Colour of eyes: Brown


Marks or special features: Small scar top of hand scar sole of left foot. Half Caste Chinese 

(No. of previous Portrait ... ) 

CONVICTIONS

Where and When Offence. Sentence

Hay Q.S

20

 7

1901

Bestiality

5 years P.S.

 


1     The Hillston Spectator and Lachlan River Advertiser, Sat 25 May 1901, p. 12. Emphasis added.

2     The Riverine Grazier, Mon 22 Jul 1901, p. 2. Emphasis added.

3     The Sydney Morning Herald, Mon 22 Jul 1901, p. 8.

4     The Riverine Grazier, Tue 23 Jul 1901, p. 4.

5     The Hillston Spectator and Lachlan River Advertiser, Sat 27 Jul 1901, p. 14.

6     SRNSW: NRS2232, [3/5973], Goulburn Gaol photographic description book, 12 Oct 1899- 25 Mar 1902, No. 1508, p. 186, R5120.